Monday, September 16, 2019

The Case for Case Studies | Episode 52


Host Kevin Patton discusses the many ways case studies can be used in teaching, why they enhance learning, and where to find them. Also, updates in factors underlying left-handedness, functional maps of the brain, and reversing biological age, plus some tips on responding to student questions.

00:44 | Left-handedness
02:54 | Responding to Students
22:30 | Sponsored by HAPS
22:59 | Mapping Brain Functions
26:55 | Sponsored by AAA
27:14 | Reversing Age
30:32 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program
31:18 | Case Studies in Teaching A&P
47:59 | Staying Connected


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If the left half of the brain controls the right half of the body then only left handed people are in their right mind. (W.C. Fields)

1 | Left-Handedness

2 minutes
A new report suggests that left-handedness, which one in ten of us exhibit, is partially influenced by genes. One effect of these genes is to change the structure of our body cells' cytoskeleton. Of course, a lot more work has to be done. By left-handers and right-handers alike.
  • Left-handed DNA found - and it changes brain structure (brief summary article) my-ap.us/2AfTLAQ
  • Handedness, language areas and neuropsychiatric diseases: insights from brain imaging and genetics (research article) my-ap.us/2AbWACQ
 left-handed writing

2 | Responding to Students

19.5 minutes
Half of students don't read the syllabus, don't read directions, don't listen to us—which can produce some frustrations when they reach out to us with questions that they already have the answer for. Somewhere nearby them. Kevin gives some tips on how to to handle these with grace and ease (taking barely any time or effort), as well as advice on heading them off before they are asked.
 students

3 | Sponsored by HAPS

0.5 minutes
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. There are a bunch of 1-day regional workshops scattered all over the continent. There's probably one near you coming up this year (or next)!
Anatomy & Physiology Society 
theAPprofessor.org/haps
 HAPS logo

4 | Mapping Brain Functions

4 minutes
We've all see various functional maps of the human brain. But once you get down to the smaller regions, or parcels, it gets weird. Beyond a certain resolution, things are very flexible. Because functions of tiny parcels vary with the state of that region of the brain in any given moment, we will probably not be able to produce a high-resolution functional map of the brain—even for any one individual.
  • There is no single functional atlas even for a single individual: Parcellation of the human brain is state dependent (research article) my-ap.us/2Aighc0
  • Brodmann areas (maps and explanation) my-ap.us/2Qc2COA

Brodmann areas

5 | Sponsored by AAA

0.5 minutes
 AAA logo

6 | Reversing Age

3.5 minutes
Can biological age be reversed? Some research in a small group of older men suggest it may be possible. Using a cocktail of common drugs, their epigenomes showed a younger biological age. Hmm.
  • First hint that body’s ‘biological age’ can be reversed (brief summary from Nature) my-ap.us/2Ad78BR
  • Reversal of epigenetic aging and immunosenescent trends in humans (research article from Aging Cell) my-ap.us/2AfUmCA

7 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you power up  your teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!
nycc.edu/hapi
 NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

8 | Case Studies in Teaching Anatomy & Physiology

16.5 minutes
In this discussion, Kevin defines what a case study is, described some different sorts of case studies, explains why case studies are such a powerful learning experience, and give sources for peer-reviewed, classroom-tested case studies for A&P. And a few odd and creative ideas, one from listener Christy Pitts, thrown in as a bonus! We're all about bonuses here.
working together

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Sponsors
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Episode 52 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview


A brief preview of the upcoming full episode 52, featuring upcoming topics that include case studies, brain mapping, age reversal, left-handedness and tips for answering student questions.

working together

There's more... some word dissections and Kevin's recommendation for The A&P Professor Book Club.

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

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Topics

1 minute

  • Using case studies in teaching A&P
  • Issues with trying to map out (parcellate) the human brain
  • A claim that the body's biological age can be reversed
  • Have we found the genes for left-handedness?
  • Responding to individual student questions: tips & tricks

Word Dissections

10.5 minutes

  • Case
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Parcellation
  • Atlas
  • Epigenetic and Epigenome

Book Club

4.5 minutes

  • Heart: A History
  • Special opportunity
    • Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers!
    • First five submitted and used will be in a drawing for a Kindle Fire HD 10 tablet
    • Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate
    • The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN)
  • Check out The A&P Professor Book Club

Heart: A History

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 

Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
 
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
 
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)
 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, September 2, 2019

The Case for Transparency | Episode 51


Host Kevin Patton asks why we should be transparent in our course and elsewhere. Plus an update on AAA's recent rebranding, how the tongue can smell, tips on serving students better, and updates on brain cells.

00:43 | Smell and Taste
02:18 | Old Gray Coat (Service to Students)
10:08 | Sponsored by HAPS
10:46 | Brain Cell Comparisons
12:50 | T Cells Attack Brain Stem Cells
15:25 | Sponsored by AAA (A New Name!)
19:35 | Transparency in Podcasting
32:16 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program
33:15 | Transparency in Teaching
42:40 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

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Honesty and transparency make you vulnerable. Be honest and transparent anyway. (Mother Teresa)

1 | Smell and Taste

1.5 minutes
Did you know that the tongue can smell? Kevin gives an update on new research.
  • Human Tongues Can Apparently Smell Things (brief summary) my-ap.us/2Lc2B7u
  • Smelling with your tongue: Identification of functional olfactory receptors in human taste cells opens doors to new approaches to modify food flavor (brief summary)my-ap.us/2LjwwL9
  • Mammalian Taste Cells Express Functional Olfactory Receptors (journal article) my-ap.us/2LhTfaD


2 | Old Gray Coat

8 minutes
You ever see me in my classic, reliable, sporty (really old) gray sport coat at a HAPS conference? If not, then maybe you haven't seen me at a HAPS conference within the last 20 or so years. Or any conference, for that matter. Having nearly lost it after the 2019 HAPS conference, I use my bad experience with a dry cleaner to more fully realize the importance of good customer-service skills when dealing with students.

3 | Sponsored by HAPS

0.5 minutes
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. There are a bunch of 1-day regional workshops scattered all over the continent. There's probably one near you coming up this year (or next)!
Anatomy & Physiology Society 
theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

4 | Brain Cell Comparisons

2 minutes
The current flurry of cellular and molecular research on brains is largely carried out in mice, with the assumption that it will inform us about human brains. Is that valid? How far does it go? Kevin cites a recent report that furthers our understanding of this comparison.
  • Conserved cell types with divergent features in human versus mouse cortex (journal article) my-ap.us/2ZtUptu
mouse brain

5 | T Cells Attack Brain Stem Cells

2.5 minutes
Yeah, another update on making new neurons in adult brains. This time, we find some evidence that "rogue" T cells may attack stem cells in the brain, specifically in the subventricular zone (SVZ), thus slowing the rate of making new neurons.
  • Rogue immune cells can infiltrate old brains: Killer T cells may dampen new nerve cell production in aged mice (summary article) my-ap.us/2LgPvWI
  • Single-cell analysis reveals T cell infiltration in old neurogenic niches (journal article) my-ap.us/2Ljx4Rd

6 | Sponsored by AAA | A New Name & Logo for AAA!

4 minutes
  • The American Association of Anatomists has recently changed its name to the American Association for Anatomy and updated its logo to better reflect its mission. Find out more in this segment, as Kevin explains the changes.
  • A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.
AAA logo

7 | Transparency in Podcasting

12.5 minutes
While participating in a gigantic conference for podcasters, Kevin learned some things about the need for transparency. In this segment, he cites some principles of being up front about financial relationships. Then he explains the story behind the financial relationships in this podcast.
Okay, a buck or two goes to funding this podcast. But don't you really NEED some hip-logo gear from The A&P Professor? Be stylish for the new academic season with your own hip mug for A&P professors! Or a shirt! Or all kinds of swag. my-ap.us/2lnFsGd

TAPP tee


8 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program 

1 minute
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you power up  your teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!
nycc.edu/hapi
NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

9 | Transparency in Teaching

9.5 minutes
Yeah, nearly everything I learn—about anything, really—I find a way to apply it to my teaching. In a previous segment, I explained some things I learned about transparency in podcasting. In this segment, I apply those principles to my teaching.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Sponsors
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Episode 51 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview


Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on transparency (in this podcast and in our teaching), updates in brain cells, olfaction on the tongue, and more.

washing a window

There's more... some word dissections and Margaret Reece's recommendation for The A&P Professor Book Club.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

 

 

Topics

2 minutes

  • Fresh episodes
  • Transparency (in this podcast and in our course)
  • AAA branding changes
  • Serving our students better
  • Updates on brain cells
  • Olfaction update

Word Dissections

5.5 minutes

  • Transparency
  • Olfaction
  • Gustation
  • Subventricular zone (SVZ)

Book Club

3.0 minutes

  • Trail Guide to Movement, Building the Body in Motion
  • Special opportunity
    • Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers!
    • First five submitted and used will be in a drawing for a Kindle Fire HD 10 tablet
    • Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate
    • The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN)
  • Check out The A&P Professor Book Club

Trail Guide to Movement

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 

Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
 
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
 
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)
 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Connecting in the Distance Course Special | Episode 50


Host Kevin Patton presents a remix of classic segments from the TAPP Radio archive, all summarizing "tricks" to increase student retention and promote student success in distance or hybrid courses.

00:00:47 | Introduction to the Special Episode
00:02:59 | Sponsored by HAPS
00:03:26 | 49 Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses
00:26:55 | Sponsored by AAA
00:27:30 | 49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses
00:49:45 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program
00:50:48 | EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses
01:09:20 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

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I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. Carl W. Buehner

 

1 | Introduction to the Special Episode

2 minutes

This is the third of a series of special episodes in which classic segments from past episodes that all reflect a similar theme are brought together for further review and reflection.

The general topic of this special episode revolves another recurring theme of this podcast:

making connections with students in online & hybrid courses

Get ready for the upcoming term with your own hip mug for A&P professors! Or a shirt! Or all kinds of swag. my-ap.us/2lnFsGd

 

 

2 | Sponsored by HAPS

0.5 minutes

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. There are a bunch of 1-day regional workshops scattered all over the continent. There's probably one near you coming up this year (or next)!

Anatomy & Physiology Society 

theAPprofessor.org/haps

 HAPS logo

 

3 | 49 Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses

32.5 minutes

Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. In this classic segment from Episode 21, Kevin shares a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.

 person using laptop

 

4 | Sponsored by AAA

0.5 minute

The searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by The American Association of Anatomists (AAA) at anatomy.org.

NOTE: AAA changed its name from The American Association of Anatomists to The American Association for Anatomy after this podcast was recorded.

AAA logo

 

5 | 49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses

22 minutes

Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin continues to share a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.

This classic segment from Episode 22 focuses on adding faces to an online course (sort of like in a face-to-face course), plus how to use scheduled video, audio, and text announcements to stay connected with students.

"A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow."
Patton's Law (Gen. George S. Patton)

 photos

 

6 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is graduate program for A&P teachers. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in instructional practice, this program helps you power up  your teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

 NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

7 | EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses

18.5 minutes

Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. In this classic segment from Episode 23, Kevin continues to share even more strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.

This segment focuses on:

  • Why reaching out to individual students who may be at risk is important--and how to do that.
  • Why feedback to students is important in nurturing connections.
  • Some final thoughts.

communicating online

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 

Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
 
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
 
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

 

 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 29, 2019

The Silent Teacher Special | Episode 49


Host Kevin Patton presents a remix of classic segments from the TAPP Radio archive, all related to the role of human remains in teaching and learning anatomy. Features two conversations with Aaron Fried.
01:00 | Introduction to the Special Episode
04:35 | Sponsored by HAPS
04:57 | The Silent Teacher | Aaron Fried
30:07 | Sponsored by AAA
30:25 | Situs Inversus
46:32 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program
46:59 | Book Club x 3
56:26 | Podcast Award Nomination
57:20 | The Nazi Anatomists | Aaron Fried
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

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The way I see it, being dead is not terribly far off from being on a cruise ship. Most of your time is spent lying on your back. The brain has shut down. The flesh begins to soften. Nothing much new happens, and nothing is expected of you. (Mary Roach)

1 | Introduction to the Special Episode

3.5 minutes
This is the second of a series of special episodes in which classic segments from past episodes that all reflect a similar theme are brought together for further review and reflection.
The general topic of this special episode revolves a recurring theme of this podcast:
using human remains (and reproductions) in teaching anatomy
Get your own hip mug for A&P professors! my-ap.us/2lnFsGd
 

2 | Sponsored by HAPS

0.5 minutes
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there.

 HAPS logo


3 | The Silent Teacher—A Conversation with Aaron Fried

25 minutes
Aaron Fried, A&P faculty at Mohawk Valley Community College and national speaker on human body donation and anatomists in Nazi Germany, joins Kevin for a lively discussion of the value of "the silent teacher"—the human body donor—in teaching human structure. This chat touches on the value of respect and appreciation of human donors, proper implementation of human remains such as skeletons in A&P courses, and how that respect should extend to reproductions of human specimens.
This is the first of two conversations with Aaron Fried. The next episode (Episode 30) will delve more deeply into the anatomy illustrations produced by anatomists in Nazi Germany and the many ethical questions surrounding their continued use in anatomy labs around the world.

Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp

  

4 | Sponsored by AAA

0.5 minute
The searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by The American Association of Anatomists (AAA) at anatomy.org.
 American Association of Anatomists

 

5 | Situs Inversus

16 minutes
Situs inversus is a mirrorlike flipping of visceral organs that occurs in embryonic development. Also called situs transversus or situs oppositus. Normal siting of organs is called situs solitus.
  • Situs inversus and my 'through the looking glass' body (recent article by someone living with situs inversus) my-ap.us/2WatPzP
  • Body donor's rare anatomy offers valuable lessons (press release on recent 99-year old donor with situs inversus with levocardia) my-ap.us/2Wf5MzO
  • Heart Transplantation in Situs Inversus Maintaining Dextrocardia (interesting study of transplanting 'normal' hearts into patients with dextrocardia) my-ap.us/2WmbTlL
 

6 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

0.5 minute
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is graduate program for A&P teachers. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in instructional practice, this program helps you power up  your teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. A new cohort starting in the fall trimester is starting now, so check it out!
 NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

7 | Book Club (x3)

9.5 minutes
Kevin revisits several book recommendations from the TAPP Book Club —all related to this episode's theme.
  • The Anatomist
    • by Bill Hayes
    • Book about Henry Gray and illustrator Henry Vandyke Carter)
    • amzn.to/2jMwlOR
  • The Silent Teacher: The Gift of Body Donation
    • by Dr. Claire Smith
    • Book about body donation in anatomical education
    • amzn.to/2lP7kTR
  • Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
    • by Mary Roach
    • amzn.to/2Ys2s51
    • Ten Things We Use When Embalming (blog post by a funeral director, shows the little discs with hooks that keep eyelids closed) my-ap.us/2Eak1ic
 book club

8 | Podcast Award Nomination

1 minute
The A&P Professor podcast needs additional nominations to get to the next round of The People's Choice Podcast Awards. Lot more. Will you please take a moment to nominate this podcast? And ask your friends and relatives, even strangers, to also nominate us?
These must be completed by the end of July!
 Podcast Award

9 | The Nazi Anatomists—A Conversation with Aaron Fried

21 minutes
Aaron Fried, A&P faculty at Mohawk Valley Community College and national speaker on human body donation and anatomists in Nazi Germany, joins Kevin for a lively discussion of the value of "the silent teacher"—the human body donor—in teaching human structure. In this second of two chats, Aaron discusses illustrations produced using executed prisoners in Nazi Germany and what this means for today's A&P teacher.

Pernkopf atlas
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Sponsors
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
also provides marketing support for this podcast. 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
Referrals also help defray podcasting expenses. 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 15, 2019

The Storytelling Special | Episode 48


00:49 | Special Series
05:24 | Storytelling in the A&P Course
20:14 | Storytelling is a Human Skill
22:16 | Sponsored by HAPS
22:38 | Playful & Serious Stories
36:43 | Sponsored by AAA
37:01 | Cells Hate Calcium
43:52 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program
44:18 | Actin & Myosin in Love
56:03 | Podcast Award Nomination
56:56 | Last Best Story
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

To be playful and serious at the same time is possible, and it defines the ideal mental condition. (John Dewey)

1 | Special Series of Episodes

4.5 minutes
This and the next few episodes will be super, spectacular, and special. So I'm calling them "specials" just like the grownups in the media world do.
These specials are single-topic-ish recasts of some of the major themes from the past 18 months of this podcast. A mix of old and new. But mostly, the classic stuff that we'll benefit from reviewing and reflecting upon.
The general topic of this special episode revolves a recurring theme of this podcast:

teaching as a form of storytelling

 

2 | Storytelling in the A&P Course

15 minutes
Kevin explains why he thinks storytelling is the heart of effective teaching, especially in the A&P course. He outlines the “storytelling persona”; making sure there is a beginning, middle, and end to our stories, applying storytelling to both lectures and the entire course, using drama, conflict and resolution, and other techniques.
 storytelling

3 | Teachers vs. Robots | AI in Teaching

2 minutes
Artificial intelligence (AI) is seen by some as the emerging technology to replace teachers. Really? How should we respond? In Episode 47, I suggest that developing the uniquely human (and humane) skills—such as storytelling—is our best strategy. This is a clip taken from the middle of that segment.
 robot

4 | Sponsored by HAPS

0.5 minutes
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. AND mention your appreciation to the HAPS leadership while you are at the conference—or anytime that you communicate with them.
Anatomy & Physiology Society 
theAPprofessor.org/haps

 HAPS logo


5 | Playfulness & Seriousness

14 minutes
Segment 1 explained Kevin's view that effective A&P teachers are good storytellers. This segment "continues the story" by discussing analogies. Analogies can be stories that help students understand complex concepts. Sometimes, they are most effective when they are playful, which helps engage students and makes the stories easy to remember. Kevin relates his use of "phosphorylation frogs" in a story that can be referred to every time ATP generation comes up in the course. What are the pros and cons of using analogies?
 playfulness

6 | Sponsored by AAA

0.5 minute
The searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by The American Association of Anatomists (AAA) at anatomy.org. Their big meeting is in April at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting in Orlando FL. Check it out!
 American Association of Anatomists

7 | Cells Hate Calcium (and Sodium) but Love Potassium

7 minutes
A simple analogy can help students remember a recurring principle about cell behavior involving important ions.

8 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

0.5 minute
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is graduate program for A&P teachers. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in instructional practice, this program helps you power up  your teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

 NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

9 | Actin & Myosin: A Love Story

12 minutes
Kevin tells the story of actin and myosin as an analogy to a classic love story. This playful story reflects the focus of recent episodes about the use of storytelling and analogies in teaching A&P.
 Romeo & Juliet

10 | Podcast Award Nomination

1 minute
The A&P Professor podcast needs additional nominations to get to the next round of The People's Choice Podcast Awards. Lot more. Will you please take a moment to nominate this podcast? And ask your friends and relatives, even strangers, to also nominate us?

PodcastAwards.com

 Podcast Award

11 | Last Best Story in Adult Neurogenesis & ANS Pathways

12 minutes
The "last best story" is what I tell my students I'm providing to them. That approach emphasizes the evolving nature of scientific understanding. In this episode, I mention two stories that are evolving right now.
reading a book

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