Monday, September 14, 2020

Stress & Community | Acronyms | Media Tips | TAPP 77


Host Kevin Patton discusses the stress we are all feeling right now and introduces a new community of support. Word Dissection: What, if anything, is an acronym? New research on the use of acronyms in science. Some practical tips for instructional video & web meetings.

  • 0:00:49 | Instructional Media Tips
  • 0:20:54 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 0:21:35 | Acronyms: Enough or Too Many?
  • 0:33:38 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 0:34:36 | Stress. Yeah. Stress.
  • 0:54:23 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 0:55:55 | Your New Online Community
  • 1:07:31 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

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Working hard for something we don't care about is called stress: Working hard for something we love is called passion. (Simon Sinek)


Instructional Media Tips

20 minutes

How can we fix that Kilroy-was-here look in our videos? Review tips on avoiding creepy-face. What are the best microphones to use for teaching online or making videos? Oh come on, do I really need headphones or earbuds?

cardoid patternKilroy was here grafitti

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Acronyms: Enough or Too Many?

12 minutes

In a twist on the usual Word Dissection feature, we explore what an acronym is—and it's a bit more complex than you might think—and some current trends in the use of acronyms in science. There's new research, too!

  • Patton's definition of acronym & list of A&P acronyms (from Survival Guide for Anatomy & Physiology) my-ap.us/2ZnpGvY
  • From ACTH to DNA: the rise of acronyms in research (brief summary article from Nature) my-ap.us/2Fq6WVp
  • The growth of acronyms in the scientific literature (research article from eLife) my-ap.us/32bW4n7
  • GGTOTD (good generic time of the day)

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Stress. Yeah. Stress.

20 minutes

Okay, I kinda got nothin' for you. But I will tell you what I've done about stress that works for me. And emphasize that I"m here for you (and where you can find others to network with).

 

  • Doing What Matters in Times of Stress: An Illustrated Guide
    • This is a free downloadable stress-management guide for coping with adversity. The guide aims to equip people with practical skills to help cope with stress. A few minutes each day are enough to practice the self-help techniques. The guide can be used alone or with the accompanying audio exercises.
    • Informed by evidence and extensive field testing, the guide is for anyone who experiences stress, wherever they live and whatever their circumstances.
    • Download here: my-ap.us/33gZ4On
  • Managing Stress and Anxiety
    • Resources form the Anxiety and Depression Association of America
    • Tips for managing anxiety and stress during times of uncertainty. Advice and resources from trusted professionals. Find support today. Up To Date Statistics. 40 Years Of Experience. A Range Of Free Resources. Evidence-Based Advice. World's Leading Experts.
    • my-ap.us/35qdDSG
  • A U.S. Pandemic of Depression, Too? Rates Are Triple Pre-COVID Levels (news article) my-ap.us/3bAz6t4
  • Mental Health Needs Rise With Pandemic (Rising mental health problems has health advocates worried about the need for additional support for struggling students and the ability of colleges to provide it) my-ap.us/35pZ3u7
  • Helping Others Dampens the Effects of Everyday Stress (post from Association for Psychological Science) my-ap.us/2Fn0Zsi
  • Management‐related stress in the red‐shouldered hawk (that stress research I did years ago) my-ap.us/35qiFhK

two sleeping cats forming tai chi symbol

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

🥂 Congratulations to Valerie O'Loughlin, the recent recipient of the HAPS President's Medal.

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Your New Community

11.5 minutes

Take The A&P Professor experience to a new level by joining the new online private community away from distracting social media platforms, tangle email threads, and the roiling sea of available webinars.

  • Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time.
  • No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do!
  • Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrations freely. And find support.
  • No algorithms. You get to choose what you want to see. You curate your own feed, selecting only those topics that interest you. Join subgroups that resonate with who you are—or who you want to be.
  • Access to mentors and like-minded peers. Our community is made up of all kinds of people from all over the world, each with different perspectives and experiences of teaching A&P. Find members near you—or far away. Connect with members online at that moment.
  • Courses, groups, and live events. As the community grows, we'll add mini-courses and micro-courses—some with earned micro-credentials, live virtual office hours with me and other mentors or guests, private special-interest groups, and more.
  • There is a very modest subscription fee to join our community.Deep discount on subscription to The A&P Professor community (good all of September 2020) theAPprofessor.org/Insider20

people chatting

 


If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 

Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!
 
Tools & Resources 
 
Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
aprovides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
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Clicking on sponsor links 
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The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)
 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 24, 2020

The Surprising Power of Digital Textbooks | TAPP 76


Like it or not, digital textbooks are here and will soon be the primary form of textbook used by students and teachers. Host Kevin Patton discusses this trend and outlines ways to leverage digital textbook features for more effective teaching and learning. Mike Pascoe brings us a Book Club recommendation and Kevin discusses arms, arm-lengths, and legs.

  • 00:48 | Digital Is Here
  • 10:09 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 11:02 | Digital Textbook Love
  • 22:43 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 23:59 | Book Club: Digital Minimalism
  • 26:29 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 27:19 | Arm's Length
  • 32:35 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
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Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. (Douglas Adams)


Digital Is Here

9.5 minutes

Like it or not, digital textbooks are here. Whether we call them eTexts, electronic textbooks, eTextbooks, or whatever, many publishers are already in the digital-first or digital-only mode. Before long, digital textbooks will soon be the primary way that students use textbooks.

  • History of the Ebook: The Changing Face of Books (journal article, but dated) my-ap.us/31koutu
  • A Brief History of eBooks (yep, very brief) my-ap.us/30x6Xio
  • Digital Is Coming For Your Textbook (blog post from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association) my-ap.us/3kqkujY

course review

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Digital Textbook Love

12 minutes

Digital textbooks have a lot of features that can be leveraged for teaching and learning—including flipped courses, distance courses, or remote pandemic teaching. For many of us, our fumbling first tries are awkward and uncomfortable—but we may eventually fall in love with digital textbooks.

two students on blanket on grass with laptop computers

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Book Club

2.5 minutes

  • Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World
  • Recommended by Mike Pascoe
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub
  • Special opportunity
    • Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers!
      • Be sure include your reasons for recommending it
    • Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate
    • The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN)
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub

Book Cover: Digital Minimalism

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Arm's Length

5 minutes

Two meters or six feet are often given as a minimum safe distance when distancing to reduce the spread of airborne viruses such COVID-19. As a practical guide, some sources state that this distance is about "two arm lengths." But Kevin questions whether "one arm span" may be what these sources really mean—and may be a better practical guide. Otherwise, people may be distancing at only about four feet and not the recommended two meters (6.5 feet)—about 60% of the most effective minimum distance. Because Kevin can never leave well enough alone.

  • In the United States, the CDC recommends, "To practice social or physical distancing, stay at least 6 feet (about 2 arms' length) from other people who are not from your household in both indoor and outdoor spaces." my-ap.us/2PBO3AS
  • The Canadian Health Service similarly advises, "keeping a distance of at least 2 arms lengths (approximately 2 metres) from others, as much as possible" my-ap.us/3fAWc32
  • "The arm span measurement is usually very close to the person's height. For example, a 168cm (5ft 6in) person will have an arm span of about 168cm (66in)" according to an article in Wikipedia my-ap.us/33ChKKp
  • Diagram giving some rough estimates (individual measurements vary)
  • Two metres or one: what is the evidence for physical distancing in covid-19? (review/analysis article from BMJ questions the 2-meter rule; includes diagram showing various levels of risk) my-ap.us/3hzDURI
diagram showing measuremen of arm vs. arm span

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 

Tools & Resources 
 
Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
aprovides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
 
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)
 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 10, 2020

The Syllabus Special | TAPP 75


The syllabus is an important instructional tool that sets the tone and provides guidance for the entire course. Host Kevin Patton discusses various aspects of a course syllabus in a comprehensive, extended episode featuring classic and fresh segments.

  • 0:00:49 | The Syllabus Special
  • 0:03:32 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 0:04:22 | Weird Word: Syllabus
  • 0:06:41 | Do Students Read the Syllabus?
  • 0:13:23 | Reading & Raiding the Syllabus
  • 0:27:32 | First-Day Activities
  • 0:45:32 | Basic Elements of a Syllabus
  • 0:58:40 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 0:59:33 | More Things to Put in a Syllabus
  • 1:10:59 | Link to Other Resources
  • 1:18:58 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 1:19:40 | Professionalism as a Course Goal
  • 1:22:41 | Syllabus Warnings
  • 1:38:03 | Nuzzel Newsletter
  • 1:39:07 | Safety Advice
  • 1:59:35 | Pronouns
  • 2:02:22 | Long-Long Syllabus
  • 2:07:32 | Staying Connected

 


If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!


 

Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself. (John Dewey)

 

Weird Word: Syllabus

2.5 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that first appeared in Understanding How We Learn, A Chat with Yana Weinstein & Megan Sumeracki | Episode 27.

Which is correct: syllabuses or syllabi? The answer may surprise you! Nevertheless, now's a good time to think about tweaking your course documents for the fall semester.

letters

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

The Anatomy Now Weekly issue with accessibility resources: my-ap.us/30tnHHH

AAA logo

 

Do Students Read the Syllabus?

6.5 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

Do students read the syllabus? Maybe half? It's the other half who drive us nuts. Wait! do we always read the directions before asking questions?

What is a syllabus? It can be different things, right? Why do administrators seem to love the syllabus so much?

 

Reading & Raiding the Syllabus

14 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

Some general considerations when designing a syllabus include make sure that students can both read the syllabus through, and raid the syllabus for key information when they need it. The key is simplicity and logic in syllabus design.

 

First-Day Activities

18 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

Is it just "here's the syllabus; see ya next class"—or is it an engaged look at important syllabus elements? The first day of class is key to starting things off on a good foot. What I learned from Krista, Michael, and Richard—and my own sideways twist on those first steps. What about a syllabus quiz? Is that a good or bad idea?

lecture hall

 

Basic Elements of a Syllabus

13 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

What exactly goes into a syllabus? Who decides? What are the essentials? This isn't comprehensive, but it gets us started.

who needs a syllabus?

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

2.5 minutes

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

More Things to Put in a Syllabus

11.5 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

Frank O'Neill recommends video walk-throughs, which have the added benefit of letting students know that you really do care about them. Consider also a table contents, abstract/summary, and/or index if the syllabus is long. How about a disclaimer, some playful tidbits, and links to external resources. And make sure your supervisors know what's in your syllabus!

 

Link to Other Resources

8 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first aired in The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | Episode 24.

Consider putting hyperlinks or URLs in the syllabus to take students to other resources. Consider linking to a FAQ page, wher you explain your rationals for doing things the way that you do them in your course.

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Professionalism as a Course Goal

3 minutes

This segment is adapted from the featured segment in Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55.

Sometimes a student frets about the A&P course being "not a spelling course" or "not an English course" — but professional communication is an essential skill for health professionals. Why not add this statement to our syllabus and/or other course documents?

Here's an example of an item from my syllabus learning outcomes and objectives from my Pre-A&P course related to professionalism:

  • work independently in a self-paced online science course
    • succeed in taking online tests and exams
    • communicate in professional scientific language, including correct spelling and usage of terminology
    • exhibit ethical professional behavior, including academic integrity

Useful links:

class

 

Syllabus Warnings

15.5 minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first published in Warnings & Safety Tips in the A&P Syllabus | Episode 57.

Kevin usually has a Warnings! page in his syllabus or other course documents. It contains three warnings about, and rationale explaining, some important things a student should know before continuing in the A&P course. There is shouting involved.

working together

 

Nuzzel Newsletter

1 minute

In the Nuzzel Newsletter for The A&P Professor, host Kevin Patton selects daily headlines that may be of interest to anatomy and/or physiology faculty. This Nuzzel newsletter is published five days a week (more or less).

To check out the archives of past Nuzzels, or to subscribe, go to: nuzzel.com/theAPprofessor

Nuzzel newsletter

 

Safety Advice

20.5  minutes

This segment is adapted from a segment that was first published in Warnings & Safety Tips in the A&P Syllabus | Episode 57.

We're held responsible (at least in part) for the safety of everyone in our classroom. How best to prepare for and facilitate safety?

fire extinguisher inside

 

Personal Pronouns

2.5 minutes

Introducing our own preferred gender pronouns opens the door for including the personal pronoun preference of student (should that be important to them) and can help connect with our students in ways that improve the learning environment.

 

Long-Long Syllabus

5 minutes

A syllabus could become massive. As with the massiveness of an elephant, the large size may be "just right." But maybe not. There are ways to reduce the size of a syllabus without losing any important content. And there ways to make a large syllabus easier to read and easier to raid. This segment revisits some ideas brought up in earlier parts of this episode.

 


 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

More details at the episode page.

Transcript available in the transcript box.

Listen to any episode on your Alexa device.

Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440

 


Tools & Resources 
 
Sponsors
 
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
 
aprovides marketing support for this podcast. 
 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
 
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
 
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)
 
 

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching | Resilience | TAPP 74


Host Kevin Patton uses the analogy of circus animals adapting to new or misplaced props to help him prepare to move courses back to campus. A lesson on resilience is just what we need right now. Book Club: Southwick & Charney's Resilience book.
  • 00:54 | Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching
  • 21:51 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 22:41 | Resilience
  • 30:51 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 31:55 | Book Club: Resilience
  • 34:13 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 35:02 | Staying Connected
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

Episode | Show Notes

More than education, more than experience, more than training, a person’s level of resilience will determine who succeeds and who fails. (Steven M. Southwick & Dennis S. Charney)

Back to Campus Pandemic Teaching

21 minutes
Kevin uses his experience as a wild animal trainer in introducing sea lions, lions, and tigers to new furniture, props, and behavior as an analogy for how to get used to the new "pandemic teaching" environment as we return to campus. And, perhaps more importantly, how to get our students comfortable in the changed campus environment.
on left is Kevin Patton with a sea lion on a brightly colored seat, on right is a bright pink yoga mat with a yellow Stealth board

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute
A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.
Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!
AAA logo

Resilience

8 minutes
Resilience is something on our minds these days, right? Kevin discusses and article outlining research in what helps us build resilience—and how we can help our students build resilience.
  • What Makes Some People More Resilient Than Others (newspaper article) my-ap.us/2COBkIt
person hold small board with word "resilience" written on it

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

2.5 minutes
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!
NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

Book Club

2 minutes
  • Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life's Greatest Challenges
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub
  • Special opportunity
    • Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers!
      • Be sure include your reasons for recommending it
    • Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate
    • The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN)
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub
book cover of Resilience: The Science of Mastering Life's Greatest Challenges

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!
Anatomy & Physiology Society
theAPprofessor.org/haps
HAPS logo

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Tools & Resources 
Sponsors
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
aprovides marketing support for this podcast. 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Zoom Fatigue and Other Symptoms of Pandemic Teaching | TAPP 73


What causes Zoom fatigue and how can we prevent it? Host Kevin Patton tackles that as well as another nasty effect of pandemic teaching: stress cardiomyopathy. Plus updates in sensory physiology, the value of keeping skill lists, and the Book Club recommends Chris Jarmey's Concise Book of Muscles.

  • 00:40 | Updating Our Skill Lists
  • 01:59 | Updates in Sensory Physiology
  • 07:30 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 08:05 | Book Club: The Concise Book of Muscles
  • 12:05 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 14:26 | Zoom Fatigue
  • 29:11 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 30:06 | Pandemic Heart: Stress Cardiomyopathy
  • 39:48 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

 

The heart was made to be broken. (Oscar Wilde)

 

Updating Our Skill Lists

1.5 minutes

Anatomy professor Amanda Meyer reminded us on Twitter that pandemic teaching has given us a lot of new skills that we should be adding to our skill list in our curriculum vitae (CV).

Skill list

 

Updates in Sensory Physiology

5.5 minutes

A few content updates to spice up our teaching.

  • Is "water" a primary taste in mammals?
    • Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water (summary of research) my-ap.us/2Zn5uuI
    • The cellular mechanism for water detection in the mammalian taste system (research paper) my-ap.us/3etufcO
  • Do we need cold receptors to feel warmth?
  • Can you hear  your tensor tympani?
    • Some People Can Make a Roaring Sound in Their Ears Just by Tensing a Muscle (brief news article) my-ap.us/38Ur7pu
    • Voluntary contraction of the tensor tympani muscle and its audiometric effects (case study) my-ap.us/2CAGxmk

tensor tympani muscle

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Book Club

4 minutes

  • The Concise Book of Muscles
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub
  • Special opportunity
    • Contribute YOUR book recommendation for A&P teachers!
      • Be sure include your reasons for recommending it
    • Any contribution used will receive a $25 gift certificate
    • The best contribution is one that you have recorded in your own voice (or in a voicemail at 1-833-LION-DEN)
  • For the complete list (and more) go to theAPprofessor.org/BookClub

The Concise Book of Muscles

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

2.5 minutes

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Zoom Fatigue

15 minutes

Zoom meetings, webinars, classes, etc., make me tired just thinking about them. I think this is part of Zoom fatigue, that exhaustion we feel from participating in video meetings. Here's a discussion of what Zoom fatigue is and how to combat it. I'm thinking of hosting a virtual telethon to support finding a cure. You in?

  • How to Combat Zoom Fatigue (article talked about in this segment) my-ap.us/3fx0V6O
  • Zoom fatigue is real — here’s why video calls are so draining (brief article) my-ap.us/3fs8USo
  • 'Zoom fatigue,' explained by researchers (brief article) my-ap.us/2AZfv83
  • ‘ZOOM FATIGUE’ IS REAL. HERE’S WHY YOU’RE FEELING IT, AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT. (brief article) my-ap.us/38XnCyq

cartoon showing a web meeting

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Pandemic Heart

10 minutes

I'm calling it pandemic heart but experts call it stress cardiomyopathy.  It's also called broken heart syndrome and several other names. One of which involves fishing for octopuses. Whatever you call it, it's incidence has more than doubled due to the pandemic.

  • Word Dissection
    • stress cardiomyopathy
    • takotsubo cardiomyopathy
    • apical ballooning syndrome
  • Clarification: The ballooning characteristic of stress cardiomyopathy is often more pronounced in the apical region of the left ventricle. 
  • Incidence of Stress Cardiomyopathy During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic (research article) my-ap.us/3emx0g1
  • Researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic (news summary of the research) my-ap.us/2ZmkKb7
  • Stress Cardiomyopathy Symptoms and Diagnosis (disease summary from Johns Hopkins) my-ap.us/2CtjE4x
  • Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (disease summary that include a lot of great still and video images of this condition) my-ap.us/3ekWL09
  • Ancient catching octopus trap. (video showing one method for using takotsubo to catch octopuses) youtu.be/ac9XSKjabjI
  • Diagram of stress cardiomyopathy (A) compared to a normal ventricle (B) by J. Heuser my-ap.us/303stda

scheme of stress cardiomyopathy

 

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Monday, June 29, 2020

Even More Pandemic Teaching Tips | TAPP 72


After acknowledging racism as that other major pandemic we must fight, host Kevin Patton carries on with even more practical tips for teaching remotely—and for taking with us back to campus. Included are tips for creating and using a home office, even when there is no room, and advice on using our office space as a media studio. Plus a brief apology.
  • 00:59 | Pandemic Teaching. Still. And Again.
  • 06:58 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 07:43 | Faculty Office in a Box
  • 14:42 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 15:36 | The Media-Friendly Faculty Office
  • 34:05 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 34:46 | An Apology
  • 35:01 | Staying Connected
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

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The beauty of anti-racism is that you don’t have to pretend to be free of racism to be an anti-racist. Anti-racism is the commitment to fight racism wherever you find it, including in yourself. And it’s the only way forward. (Ijeoma Oluo)

Pandemic Teaching. Still. And Again.

6 minutes
Things happen. And we should be prepared for further shifts and sudden switches as we move through the summer sessions and into fall. As we deal with the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, we also fight the effects of that other pandemic: racism.
road with sand blowing over it

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute
A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.
Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!
AAA logo

Faculty Office in a Box

7 minutes
Don't have an office space to use at home? Got you covered!
laptop computer on sofa, with slippers on floor

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute
The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!
NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

The Media-Friendly Faculty Office

18 minutes
Audio and video tips for remote teaching—but which are useful for on-campus teaching, too.
ring light with googly eyes next to clock on top of computer screen

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute
The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!
Anatomy & Physiology Society
theAPprofessor.org/haps
HAPS logo

An Apology

1 minute
I ask forgiveness for using the term "Spanish flu," which is considered by many to be an insult to Spanish people. I used this term in Mid-Winter Winterizing of Our Courses | Bonus Episode 63
  • Spain hated being linked to the deadly 1918 flu pandemic. (Newspaper article) my-ap.us/2CQknwV
hands forming a heart on a beach

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Tools & Resources 
Sponsors
Transcript and captions for this episode
are supported by the 
aprovides marketing support for this podcast. 
Distribution of this episode is supported by 
NYCC's online graduate program in 
Clicking on sponsor links 
helps let them know you appreciate
their support of this podcast!
Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.