Monday, October 8, 2018

Using Media in Our A&P Course - Advice From Barbara Waxer | TAPP Radio 28


0:40 | How many genes in the human genome? An update.
4:36 | A new sensory structure found in the gut
9:27 | Featured: Advice on using media properly - chat with Barbara Waxer

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1 | Update: Number of Genes in Human Genome 4 minutes

A recent article in Science News kinda sounds like the known number of genes in the human genome has doubled since the report cited in a recent episode. Nope. It's just that experts are now often including both protein-coding genes and noncoding (RNA-coding) genes in the total.

 

2 | New Sensory Structure Found in the Gut 5 minutes

A new sensory structure has been documented in the lining of the mammalian gut. It involves the enteroendocrine cell, which has now been shown to synapse with neurons that lead to the brain via the vagus nerve, sort of like other epithelial-nervous sensory structures like the tactile disk (Merkel disk) arrangement in the skin.

 neuropod cell

 

3 | Interview with Barbara Waxer 30.5 minutes

Barbara Waxer, a professor of media and expert in copyright and the use of media joins Kevin for a chat about a topic that has come up before: how to properly use media created by others in our A&P course.

 teaching the skeleton

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, September 24, 2018

Understanding How We Learn, a Chat with Yana Weinstein & Megan Sumeracki | TAPP Radio 27


0:59 | New discovery about the shape of red blood cells
4:54 | Featured: Chat with the authors of a new book about how we learn

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"Educational practice does not, for the most part, rely on research findings. Instead, there's a preference for relying on our intuitions about what's best for learning. But relying on intuition may be a bad idea for teachers and learners alike."
Yana Weinstein & Megan Sumeracki in Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide

 

1 | Regulation of Red Blood Cell Shape 4 minutes

Recent evidence points to a myosin-actin interaction in  the cytoskeleton connected to the plasma membrane as a key mechanism for regulating RBC deformability. Thus that old myosin-actin attraction learned while exploring muscle contraction accomplishes important tasks in other parts of the body, too!

actin-myosin interaction in RBC

 

2 | Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide 23 minutes

Dr. Yana Weinstein and Dr. Megan Sumeracki join Kevin for an informative chat about their new book Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide. These learning scientists explain how A&P professors can use the six strategies for learning in their courses to help students learn.

Please call in with your reactions, questions for the authors, comments, and ideas for implementing the tips in this book:

  • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
  • podcast@theAPprofessor.org

Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide

Here's an example of a visual chapter preview mentioned in the interview.
sample graphic chapter preview Sample from Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide

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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Modeling Professional Integrity | TAPP Episode 26



0:42 | A new micro-organ in our lymph nodes?
5:31 | Daily Nuzzel newsletter with curated headlines for A&P teachers
7:18 | Succeed in A&P podcast mentioned us!
9:04 | Featured: Modeling professional integrity18:36 | The A&P Student blog

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I don't think it works very well to tell our students to be ethical. We have to show them what ethical looks like.
Kevin Patton

1 | A New Micro-Organ? 4.5 minutes
One headline announced the discovering of a new human micro-organ. It turns out, researchers have found a distinct structure just beneath the capsule of lymph nodes called the subscapsular proliferative focus (SPF) where memory B cells hang out—not deep in the germinal center (GC).  This puts them in a good position to be activated by macrophages acting as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and mount a strong secondary immune response.
SPF in lymph node

2 | Curated daily headlines in the Nuzzel newsletter 2 minutes
Sign up for a free email subscription to Kevin's daily headlines curated especially for A&P teachers.

3 | Succeed in A&P podcast
 2 minutes
The A&P Professor podcast received a couple of mentions in Jim Connely's podcast Succeed in A&P. Check out the August 31 episode, featuring Krista Rompolski!
succed in A&P podcast

4 | Modeling Professional Integrity 9.5 minutes
Greg Crowther, whose song was featured in episode 25, calls in with an important point about modeling professional integrity for students: we should always cite the work of others. Whether we are using material legally is a separate issue. If we tell students they are plagiarizing if they don't cite others' works, then we are hypocrites if we don't model that behavior ourselves.
Kevin mentions some other benefits of consistently citing the work we use in our courses.
Please call in with your reactions, ideas, and tips for promoting academic integrity:
  • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
  • podcast@theAPprofessor.org
posterior human skeleton
  Vesalius: The Fabric of the Human Body

5 | The A&P Student

3.5 minutes
The A&P Professor is Kevin Patton's blog for A&P students. You can link to the blog, or to any specific post within the blog, from your course materials (syllabus, course page, learning management system, emails/messages to students). Kevin (mostly Jenny, his wife) sends out bookmarks you can distribute to your students. This wacky bookmark has an anatomical illustration of eyeballs in their orbits on the obverse and information (including URL) about the blog on the reverse. If you mention that you are a podcast listener, you'll also get the almost coveted The A&P Professor label pin (authorized for use on your academic attire).
Eyeball bookmark
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 27, 2018

Promoting Academic Integrity in Our Course | TAPP Episode 25



Greg Crowther sings A Physiologist's Blessing (3.5 min)
Button & zipper junctions in the lymphatic capillaries (7.5 min)
Methods to promote academic honesty and reduce cheating (28.5 min)
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You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view […] until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.
Harper Lee

(0:44) If you keep up with the HAPS Blog from the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS), you may have already accept Dr. Greg Crowther's challenge to incorporate songs into your A&P course this semester. With his permission, here's a song from Greg that's great for the first day of class!
Dr. Greg Crowther teaches anatomy and physiology at Everett Community College (WA).  His peer-reviewed articles on enhancing learning with content-rich music have collectively been cited over 100 times.
keyboard


(4:14) Are you familiar with the button junctions that connect overlapping endothelial cells in lymphatic capillaries in a way that forms valves? What about zippers? Where do they fit into the story? (They do.) Here are some links to the details behind a great demo that Kevin shares for understanding lymphatic structure and function.
 buttons


(11:55) One way to approach "the cheating issue" in our courses is to promote a culture of academic honesty from the start. But how do we do that? Kevin shares some practical tips you can use for a comprehensive approach to creating and maintaining a culture of professional and academic integrity in your A&P courses (or any courses, really).
Please call in with your ideas and tips for promoting academic integrity:
  • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
  • podcast@theAPprofessor.org
 class
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 20, 2018

The First Ten Years of The A&P Professor!

On July 4, 2008, I published the first post on this blog—thereby launching The A&P Professor. 

I picked July 4—U.S. Independence Day—as my start date so that it would be easy for me to remember. It didn't work, though. It just yesterday occurred to me that I'd missed the tenth anniversary! Better a tiny bit late than never, eh?

I started The A&P Professor as a way to share what I'd learned—and am still learning—about the teaching of human anatomy & physiology. Having had a wonderful mentor in my early years of teaching of A&P (thank you, Sr. Virginia), and scores of colleagues sharing their A&P teaching wisdom in the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS), I felt like I wanted to pass along the many treasures I'd collected over three decades.

And, well, I'm a writer. Meaning it's my nature to write things and share them. So I guess a blog was a natural fit for me, eh?

At first, I thought it might also be a way to share the "inside story" of my various textbooks, lab manuals, and other publications. But I soon realized that The A&P Professor works best when I don't do that. So I soon moved that aspect to other outlets and focus on the art and science of teaching A&P, period.

Soon came the website at theAPprofessor.org where I posted a lot of resources for teaching A&P. A year or so ago, the website got a big makeover and more modern design that works well on mobile devices. During that process, a lot of old stuff was tossed out and the website streamlined to be more of a professional development venue.

Along the way, I added a newsletter version of the blog, so that you can get an emailed copy of each new post as soon as it's posted—so you don't have to keep an eye on the blog.

The A&P Professor has long been registered as a trademark in the U.S., so we can all count on it being what it is and with the same person running it—and not something else entirely.

Along the way, I've added social media presence in Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and other channels. And a daily, curated roundup of science and teaching headlines at Nuzzel.

And, oh boy, have I heard from many of y'all over the years! It warms my heart when you stop me at a HAPS meeting, drop me an email note or tweet, or give me a call and tell me how much this or that thing I mentioned in my blog or another outlet has helped you. Or better, has got you thinking about a new direction to go in. You know, that feeling you get when a student or alum has told you that something you shared with them has truly helped them—or lit their own creative spark. There's not a feeling like it in the world, is there?

You're probably tired of hearing about (or just hearing) my podcast featuring content updates and teaching strategies for A&P. This latest (ad)venture is just the latest of the many ways I've been working to promote continuous improvement in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology. Mostly my own. As they say... when we teach, we learn. They're right!

I hope you'll continue your support of The A&P Professor for the next ten years.


For those who have not yet heard any of the new podcast series, try the first episode and move forward from there.




Monday, August 13, 2018

The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | TAPP Episode 24


Introduction (2 min)
Do students read the syllabus? What is a syllabus? (8 min)
Reading and raiding the syllabus (14.5 min)
First-day activities | A syllabus quiz? (18.5 min)

Basic elements of a syllabus (13.5 min)
More things to put in a syllabus (12 min)
Study strategies, extra topics, & FAQs (8.5 min)
Conclusion (1 min)

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There is a peculiar aesthetic pleasure in constructing the form of a syllabus, or a book of essays, or a course of lectures. Visions and shadows of people and ideas can be arranged and rearranged like stained-glass pieces in a window, or chessmen on a board.
A. S. Byatt

woman leaning forward

(0:58) It's a BONUS episode, meaning that you get bonus minutes, meaning that it's a really, really long episode!
  • How eccentric do you think Kevin is? Other listeners want to know! Really.
    • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
    • podcast@theAPprofessor.org

 

(3:03) Do students read the syllabus? Maybe half? It's the other half who drive us nuts. Wait! do we always read the directions before asking questions?
What is a syllabus? It can be different things, right? Why do administrators seem to love the syllabus so much?

who needs a syllabus?


(11:09) Some general considerations when designing a syllabus include make sure that students can both read the syllabus through, and raid the syllabus for key information when they need it. The key is simplicity and logic in syllabus design.

(25:36) Is it just "here's the syllabus; see ya next class"—or is it an engaged look at important syllabus elements? The first day of class is key to starting things off on a good foot. What I learned from Krista, Michael, and Richard—and my own sideways twist on those first steps. What about a syllabus quiz? Is that a good or bad idea?

lecture hall

(44:24) What exactly goes into a syllabus? Who decides? What are the essentials? This isn't comprehensive, but it gets you

(57:47) Frank O'Neill recommends video walk-throughs, which have the added benefit of letting students know that you really do care about them. Consider also a table contents, abstract/summary, and/or index if the syllabus is long. How about a disclaimer, some playful tidbits, and links to external resources. And make sure your supervisors know what's in your syllabus!

(1:09:38) Consider putting hyperlinks or URLs in the syllabus to take students to other resources. Consider linking to a FAQ page, wher you explain your rationals for doing things the way that you do them in your course.

(1:18:07) Final thoughts. Okay, no real thoughts. Just be glad you made it this far!

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, August 6, 2018

EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 23


Medical mitochondria (4 min)
Syllabuses: I need your help (1 min)
Review of first two parts of this series (3 min)
Featured: EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses (18.5 min)


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(0:42) New research proposes using mitochondria isolated from healthy tissue in a patient's body to treat ischemic heart muscle and perhaps other dysfunctional tissues or organs.

mitochondria


(4:44) Syllabuses, syllabi. Whatever. It's almost time to think about tweaking our course documents for the fall semester. I'll cover that in an upcoming episode, so I need you to send your contributions now!
  • Please share your syllabus ideas, questions, or comments at:
    • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
    • podcast@theAPprofessor.org

 

(5:55) It's too long for one episode, so it's a series of three episodes: 21, 22 (previous episodes), and 23 (this episode).
If you're not teaching online now, you will be someday! Most of these tips apply to face-to-face courses, anyway.
In  the previous two episodes, Kevin suggested:
  • It's all about connections.
  • Cultivate a friendly, informal, and supportive "online teaching persona"
  • Express empathy, don't just have empathy.
  • Use customer-service skills when communicating with students
  • Use our own pain points and frustrations to tap into how our students might feel
  • How we can literally make our online course a face to face course
  • How to use faces, voices, and scheduled course announcements to enhance the connections necessary to retain students and promote student success.

 (8:47) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin continues to share even more strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
This episode focuses on:
  • Why reaching out to individual students who may be at risk is important--and how to do that.
  • Why feedback to students is important in nurturing connections.
  • Some final thoughts.
communicating online
If you experience a repeated section starting about about timestamp 21:36, it's not your imagination. Probably. A pre-release version had such a hiccup and it may have been downloaded into your app. If so, you can simply re-download in the app. Or enjoy twice the fun by leaving the repeat in there!
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 23, 2018

49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 22


Syllabuses? Syllabi? Which is correct? (3 min)
Continuing the conversation (1 min)
Featured: 49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses (22 min)
Next episode is part 3 of 3 (1 min)


Please nominate The A&P Professor for The People's Choice Podcast Awards! Simply click here to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category. Listener nominations close on July 31st.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
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(0:44) Which is correct: syllabuses or syllabi? The answer may surprise you! Nevertheless, now's a good time to think about tweaking your course documents for the fall semester. I'll cover that on a future episode, so I need you to send your contributions now!
letters

(4:02) It's too long for one episode, so Kevin will cover the featured topic in three episodes: 21 (the previous episode), 22 (this episode), and 23 (the next episode).
If you're not teaching online now, you will be someday! Most of these tips apply to face-to-face courses, anyway.
In  the previous episode, Kevin suggested:
  • It's all about connections.
  • Cultivate a friendly, informal, and supportive "online teaching persona"
  • Express empathy, don't just have empathy.
  • Use customer-service skills when communicating with students
  • Use our own pain points and frustrations to tap into how our students might feel

 (8:10) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin continues to share a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
This episode focuses on adding faces to an online course (sort of like in a face-to-face course), plus how to use scheduled video, audio, and text announcements to stay connected with students.
"A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow."
Patton's Law (Gen. George S. Patton)
photos


(30:23) The next episode continues the conversation about improving engagement in online courses.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Please Nominate The A&P Professor for a Podcast Award.

I need your help.

I've registered The A&P Professor podcast for The People's Choice Podcast Award. Now, I need a lot of listener nominations to get the podcast to the next stage.

Can you take just a minute to register as a listener and select The A&P Professor as a nominee in the Education category?

Such recognition will attract more listeners and that will enlarge the pool from which we can draw ideas and share them in the podcast. Win-Win, eh?

Thanks for your support!


Simply click here: my-ap.us/award to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category.

Listener nominations close on July 31st.


So now would be a good time.

Monday, July 9, 2018

49 Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 21


Transcripts, captioned audiograms, &  more! (7.5 min)
Intro to featured topic (1 min)
49 tricks for retention & success in online courses (32.5 min)
Connecting with this podcast (1 min)
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
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(0:41) We've reached 5,000 downloads because of your kind support! All TAPP Radio episodes have a full transcript, useful for reading along or searching for specific content. Captioned audiograms of all episodes are now available on The A&P Professor YouTube channel. There are many ways to listen!
cover image for YouTube audiogram



(7:58) Intro. It's too long for one episode, so Kevin will cover the featured topic in three episodes: 21 (this one), 22, and 23.

(9:13) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin shares a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
 person using laptop


(33:00) Call or write! Really. Any time.

Please nominate The A&P Professor for
The People’s Choice Podcast Awards!

Simply click here my-ap.us/award to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category.
Listener nominations close on July 31st.
So now would be a good time.


If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 25, 2018

Reading A&P Terms Out Loud Helps Reading Comprehension | TAPP Episode 20


How many genes in the human genome? (3.5 min)
Free book of brain facts (2.5 min)
Expand the reach of this podcast (3.5 min)
Why students should read A&P terms out loud (10 min)

Binge much? (1 min)

 

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(0:43) New research increases the number of coding genes in the human genome up from around 19,000 or so genes to just over 21,000 genes.

 

 

(4:12) Brain Facts book: great summary of basic concepts of neuroscience (with great pictures).

  • Brain Facts (from Society of Neuroscience; has links to low- and high-resolution PDFs, audio files of previous editions, and requests for free print versions for educators)

 brain

 

 

(6:50) I ask your help to spread the news and share this podcast with others who might be interested. Or complete strangers. Okay, maybe just folks you know who are actual A&P teachers or have related interests.

 

 

(10:23) It sounds wacky, for sure, but reading complex terms out loud before reading the textbook can helps speed up reading and improve comprehension.

man reading

 

 

(20:57) Even if you've already heard them all, it's worth your while to listen again, starting at Episode 1 and working your way through. If you know you've missed some previous episodes, that's an even better reason to binge!

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Caring for Students Helps Them Succeed | TAPP Episode 19


Summer schedule reminder (< 1 min)
Giving slides to students (6 min)
Update on the TAPP APP (1.5 min)
Catch up with sleep on weekends (3 min)
Commit to caring for our A&P students (19 min)

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You've probably heard that students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. Hold that thought.

(0:42) Reminder: episodes released about twice a month during the summer.

Slide handout

(1:01) Students often want a copy of our slide presentation before class, so that they can take notes by simply annotating our slides. Is that a good idea?

(7:11) The easiest way to listen to (and follow) this podcast (TAPP Radio) is with the feature-rich TAPP APP

(8:58) Is it okay to sleep in on weekends to "catch up" with sleep lost during the week? Some new evidence from a large study.

students

(11:20) Why Kevin is committing to take specific steps to show his students that he really cares about them. And how he is committing to care, no matter what.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Contour Drawing Helps Students Learn Anatomy | TAPP Episode 18


TAPP APP now available! (2 min)
Introduction to Paul Krieger (2 min)
Contour drawing for anatomy with Paul Krieger (19 min)
Change to a biweekly podcast schedule (1 min)

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
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Jean Fernel once wrote, "Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history. It describes the theater of events."

  

(0:44) This episode announces the availability of the dedicated app for this podcast--the TAPPradio app or TAPP APP. Kevin mentions the Android version, but after production, the Apple iOS app also became available. The app will provide some bonus materials and will usually have episodes available about 6 hours before they are released to other channels. It's the easiest way to keep up with this podcast!

 

 

(2:30) Paul Krieger of Grand Rapids Community College is a long-time professor and the author of Morton Publishing's Visual Analogy Guide series. Kevin and Paul have been friends and collaborators for over 15 years.

 

 

contour drawing

(6:10) In an interview with Kevin, Paul Krieger discusses a teaching experiment he is trying with his community college students that involves drawing as a pre-lab activity. Contour drawing, or outlining, organs can help students get a good sense of the general structure of organs they'll see during the lab activity. Hand labeling the sketches adds additional learning opportunities. Paul describes his method for moving students slowly and simply through a series of easy steps using PowerPoint slides.

 

(22:26) The summer break is a great time to switch to a slower pace for this podcast. After a series of weekly episodes, TAPP Radio now shifts to a twice-a-month goal for new episodes. Thanks for your support!

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.