Monday, July 19, 2021

Six More Textbook Tricks | Teaching With Your Textbook Effectively | TAPP 97


We faculty rarely talk about how to use textbooks effectively. Not with each other, not with students, not with anybody. And we've probably not ever had any training in how to use what is a key tool in teaching and learning the typical A&P course. This episode solves that problem!

00:00 | Introduction

00:46 | More Textbook Tricks

03:20 | Transparency

06:46 | Sponsored by AAA

08:04 | Read and Raid

12:46 | Sponsored by HAPI

14:17 | Honor The Textbook

32:44 | Sponsored by HAPS

34:28 | (You) Read The Textbook

39:44 | Teach Your Students How to Read Textbooks

49:26 | Loving & Learning About Textbooks

51:16 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-97.html

🏅 Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-97.html/#badge

❓ Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

☝️ Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

✔️ Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor

📰 Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates

“While you can't hold on to everything forever, you're a fool if you sell back your college books at semester's end: have you learned nothing of this life?” (Ander Monson)

 

More Textbook Tricks

2.5 minutes

In Episode 94, I discussed the reasons why our A&P textbooks often seem to be too large. In this episode, I return to the scene of the crime to discuss some other aspects of how we look at our textbooks and how we use them.

Do A&P Textbooks Have Too Much Content? | TAPP 94

★ Your Textbook is a Mitten, Not a Glove (Kevin's brief article mentioned in this segment) https://my-ap.us/2E0sZP1
READ and RAID your textbook (Kevin's brief article for students on a useful approach to using their A&P textbook) my-ap.us/2P3KuBZ

★ Selling your textbook? (Kevin's brief article for students on why they need to keep their A&P textbook—to access that "extra content" in their later courses & career) my-ap.us/3g8Q9Fm

open book with text: Do A&P Textbooks have too much content? Episode 94

 

Transparency

3.5 minutes

In Episode 51, I discussed why we should be transparent with students about how and why we do things in our course. In this episode, I apply that principle to the A&P textbook.

The Case for Transparency | Episode 51

Episode 51

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Read and Raid

4.5 minutes

In Episode 75, I briefly explained the "read and raid" principle of using textbooks briefly, when discussing how it can be applied to the course syllabus. Here, I discuss the original notion of read and raid by discussion how it works in the A&P textbook.

The Syllabus Special | TAPP 75

READ and RAID your textbook (a link for students; explains the “read & raid principle” as applied to textbooks) my-ap.us/2P3KuBZ

two common ways to use a textbook: read, raid

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program at Northeast College of Health Sciences. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

Logo of Northeast College of Health Sciences, Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction

 

Honor The Textbook

18.5 minutes

If we want to model professional behavior, we can voice any disagreements we have with our course textbook without resorting to disagreeable "hating" on the textbook. And we should remember to give feedback to the authors when we find mistakes or other issues. That's the kind of professional we want to be, right?

man with book at a computer

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1.5 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

(You) Read The Textbook

5.5 minutes

We should read the textbook every time we teach. It's a habit that pays big dividends for teaching and learning.

Stiff! The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers (book mentioned here as being an upcoming selection of the HAPS Book Club has also been listed in The A&P Professor Book Club) theapprofessor.org/bookclub.html#badge-B019

man reading

 

Teach Your Students How to Read Textbooks

9.5 minutes

Reading a textbook requires a strategy. We are in a position to help our students find their strategy by using metacognition and available published textbook strategies.

★ Reading Strategies: Reading the Textbook (Kevin's page for A&P students that you can link to from your course) lionden.com/reading.htm

★ The A&P Student Reading Strategies (collection of posts from Kevin's blog for A&P students) theAPstudent.blogspot.com/search/label/reading

woman reading a book

 

Loving & Learning About Textbooks

2 minutes

There's a lot more to a textbook than most of us think. What I mean is that we ought to think more about how to best use our course textbook and how to best coach our students in learning from their A&P textbook.

books

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-97.html

★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-97.html

★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 

theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 

theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates

★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J

★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander

★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ

★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW

★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp

★ JotForm (build forms for free): theAPprofessor.org/jotform

★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors

★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org

★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps

★ Distribution of this episode is supported by the Northeast College of Health Sciences online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor

The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 5, 2021

Even More Slide Tricks | Ultimate Effective Teaching Presentations | TAPP 96


We continue our two-part series that explores simple ways that we can make our teaching slides more engaging—and therefore more effective for learning. Let's leave behind those boring slide templates and make our presentations work better for our lectures, case studies, labs, and other learning activities.

00:00 | Introduction

00:46 | Previous Slide Tricks

06:23 | Sponsored by AAA

07:36 | Proper Use of Terminology

14:34 | Distorting Images

15:50 | Sponsored by HAPI

17:06 | Terrific Title Slides

29:12 | Sponsored by HAPS

30:07 | Avoid Presenting in Edit Mode

32:12 | Don't Read Slides & Don't Always Follow Rules

34:33 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-96.html

🏅 Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-96.html/#badge

❓ Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

☝️ Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

✔️ Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor

📰 Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates

 

Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere. (Albert Einstein)

 

Previous Slide Tricks

5.5 minutes

Before getting down to learning new tricks, we take a moment to review the tricks already learned (or reviewed) in the previous episode—Episode 95.

More Slide Tricks | Effective Teaching Presentations | TAPP 95

★ Also review:

★ ★ Teaching Slides: Smooth and Simple Animations Dramatize the Story of A&P | TAPP 89

★ ★ Slides Serve the Story of Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 66

★ ★ Simple Ideas for Pandemic Teaching | Episode 67

★ ★ The Storytelling Special | Episode 48

cover for episode 96: Even More Slide Tricks with photo of lecture hall

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Proper Use of Terminology

7 minutes

If we use different terminology or formatting (e.g., of ion notation, chemical formulae, etc.) than our textbook, we need to connect that for students. Even better, stick with the content and style of the textbook. Proper usage models professional and accurate communication for students.

International Terminology

More on Spelling, Case, & Grammar | Episode 56

Communication, Clarity, & Medical Errors | Episode 55

The Eponym Episode | Using Modern Terminology | Episode 40

More on Eponyms in A&P Terminology | Episode 41

mammillary

 

Distorting Images

1.5 minutes

We want to make our images on slides as large as possible. But if we enlarge disproportionately—to make it fit just right—then it may confuse students. At the very least, it will appear unprofessional and perhaps a bit jarring. Just don't, okay?

distorted image of sagittal section of head showing the olfactory bulb

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program at Northeast College of Health Sciences. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

Logo of Northeast College of Health Sciences, Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction

 

Terrific Title Slides

12 minutes

Why use boring title slides that simply have the topic, chapter title, and/or chapter number? That signal to students, "prepare to be bored." Yep, I think so. Let's chunk our slide decks into short modules, each with an interesting title slide that tells students, "we're going on another adventure!" Here are some ideas.

★ 10 creative Ideas for your Title- and End-Slides in Presentations my-ap.us/3jvIMeo

Using Media in Our A&P Course & Advice From Barbara Waxer | Episode 28

Finding Media | Images and More for Teaching Anatomy & Physiology

★ Public Domain Images For Artists - 25+ Collections | MoMa UK (curated collection of art you can use in your presentations) my-ap.us/2Tb7QfU

Vincent Van Gogh's painting of a skull

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Avoid Presenting in Edit Mode

2 minutes

Lots of ideas on using images effectively in our slides. Images may be the true heart and purpose of using slides to teach.

Finding Media | Images and More for Teaching Anatomy & Physiology

edit screen of PowerPoint with red circle & slash symbol

 

Don't Read Slides & Don't Always Follow Rules

2.5 minutes

Just don't.

person doing trick on skateboard

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-96.html

★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-96.html

★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 

theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 

theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates

★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J

★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander

★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ

★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW

★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp

★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors

★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org

★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps

★ Distribution of this episode is supported by the Northeast College of Health Sciences online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor

The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 21, 2021

More Slide Tricks | Effective Teaching Presentations | TAPP 95


Everybody loves to hate teaching with slides. But maybe that's because we've not fully developed our skills! Host Kevin Patton build on previous advice to improve our mastery of the slide-of-hand we need for effective learning. Let's turn that hate into love! This is the first of a two-episode series.

00:00 | Introduction

00:58 | Buy One, Get One

02:06 | I Need Help!

10:20 | Sponsored by AAA

11:47 | Less Text, More Story

24:25 | Sponsored by HAPI

25:49 | Chunky Style Slides

39:44 | Sponsored by HAPS

41:08 | Where Art Thou?

48:16 | Slide Tricks

50:12 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-95.html

🏅 Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-95.html/#badge

❓ Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

☝️ Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

✔️ Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor

📰 Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates

The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

 

Buy One, Get One

1 minute

This is the first of two episodes in a series about using slides to teach effectively. Yeah, I know—everybody hates the idea of using slides. But maybe it's because we don't know how to use them well. And yeah, some of this has been covered in different ways in previous episodes. But this kind of overlap—or layering—is a proven learning technique, right?

Teaching Slides: Smooth and Simple Animations Dramatize the Story of A&P | TAPP 89

Slides Serve the Story of Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 66

Simple Ideas for Pandemic Teaching | Episode 67

The Storytelling Special | Episode 48

photo of an empty lecture hall from the back

 

I Need Help!

8 minutes

We're all a bit overloaded and overwhelmed these days, right? Yeah, I'm feeling that pain right now. I need help. Will you please help me?

TAPP Journal Club with Krista Rompolski

Test Question Templates Help Students Learn | TAPP 70

4 people, arm in arm, with T shirts printed with "Volunteer"

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Less Text, More Story

12.5 minutes

I've said this before. I say it all the time. You're sick of me saying it. But you know what? We need that continual and consistent messaging so that maybe it will eventually become part of our working memory—our conscious awareness. So here, we go again.

Teaching Slides: Smooth and Simple Animations Dramatize the Story of A&P | TAPP 89

Slides Serve the Story of Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 66

Simple Ideas for Pandemic Teaching | Episode 67

The Storytelling Special | Episode 48

★ 10 tips on how to make slides that communicate your idea, from TED’s in-house expert (example of a TED Talk) my-ap.us/3gI6FgP

storytelling

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program at Northeast College of Health Sciences. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

Logo of Northeast College of Health Sciences, Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction

 

Chunky Style Slides

14 minutes

If we follow the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) mindset, we know that chunking content into pieces that are easy for students to focus on. But why do we often end up putting a lot of concepts on one teaching slide? Here, I suggest that "chunky style" may be best for learning. And I also suggest that a useful mantra to chant while putting text into our slides is, "think telegraph, not paragraph."

★ Guidelines for Universal Design for Learning (UDL) my-ap.us/UDLguidelines

slogan "Adding text to your slide? Think telegraph, not paragraph."

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Where Art Thou?

7 minutes

Lots of ideas on using images effectively in our slides. Images may be the true heart and purpose of using slides to teach.

Finding Media | Images and More for Teaching Anatomy & Physiology

retina

 

Slide Tricks

2 minutes

A wrap up of points made in this episode—there are so many! And a look ahead at the next episode.

silhouette of a person doing a handstand with a skateboard

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-95.html

★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-95.html

★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 

theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 

theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates

★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J

★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander

★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ

★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW

★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp

★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors

★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org

★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps

★ Distribution of this episode is supported by the Northeast College of Health Sciences online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor

The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 7, 2021

Do A&P Textbooks Have Too Much Content? | TAPP 94


Oh, that huge A&P textbook I teach from! Do I really need to cover all of it? Host Kevin Patton discusses his take on this age-old problem. Does the color of my marking pen send a signal that I don't want to send to my students? A breakthrough in understanding how teeth sense cold. And what in the world is a tunneling nanotube—and can I get one at my local hardware store? Greek names for SARS-CoV-2 variants simplifies conversation and avoids stigma.

00:00 | Introduction

00:43 | How Do Teeth Sense Cold?

07:04 | Sponsored by AAA

08:32 | Red & Green for Student Feedback

18:03 | What's a TNT?

23:52 | Sponsored by HAPI

25:06 | Greek Names for COVID Variants

30:24 | Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? Are Mittens Too Big?

36:41 | Sponsored by HAPS

39:15 | Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? What About Novels?

46:35 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html/#badge

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor

Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates

Do A&P textbooks have too much content? Don't tell me that thought has never occurred to you! (Kevin Patton)

 

How Do Teeth Sense Cold?

6.5 minutes

We know that teeth damaged by caries (cavities), decay, injury, wear, etc., can be very sensitive to cold—such as ice cream or cold drinks. But we've struggled to come up with a mechanism for that. A new discovery proposes that the ion channel TRCP5 may be the responsible cold sensor. And that may lead to some easy fixes for cold-sensitive teeth. 

★ Odontoblast TRPC5 channels signal cold pain in teeth (discovery from Science Advances mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3w888Cg

★ Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 5 (TRPC5) is a cold-transducer in the peripheral nervous system (some earlier research on the cold-sensing function of TRPC5) my-ap.us/3pnhdEM

★ Image from PxHere

person with ice cream cone

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Red & Green for For Student Feedback

9.5 minutes

Kevin revisits his recommendation to use a green pennot a red pen—for marking grades and giving student feedback. That holds over to digital communications, such as course announcements and instructions, too. Listen to the reasons—you may be surprised!

★ No Red Pens! (Kevin’s blog post on this topic; with links to additional information/research) my-ap.us/2SbyDbr

Give Your Course a Half Flip With a Full Twist | Episode 6 (Kevin's earlier discussion of green pens for marking)

★ Coblis—Color Blindness Simulator (you can paste in your text with color fonts, or an image, and see what it might look like in major color vision variants) my-ap.us/2T33Xt6

★ Green Pens geni.us/p2BW

★ Photo by animatedheaven from PxHere

the word "Success!" being underlined with a green pen

 

What's a TNT?

5.5 minutes

The tunneling nanotube (TNT) is not an organelle we typically discuss in the undergrad A&P course—just like a lot of other recently-discovered organelles. But sometimes it's worth mentioning the ongoing work of discovery in this area—and the excitement of such exploration—as a way to connect students with our course content.

★ Tunneling nanotubes: Reshaping connectivity (review-opinion article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3fUpM6X

★ Wiring through tunneling nanotubes--from electrical signals to organelle transfer (an earlier work from Journal of Cell Science) my-ap.us/3poC5LW

★ Got Proteasomes? (Kevin's brief post about why he teaches proteasomes in A&P) my-ap.us/3pp0NvA

★ Image from Radiation Oncology

two red cells connected by a long tunneling nanotube (TNT)

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Greek Names for COVID Variants

5.5 minutes

Considering the adverse social effects of calling the 1918 influenza "Spanish flu" and the SARS-CoV-2 "the China virus," the World Health Organization has proposed calling variants of SARS-CoV-2 by letters of the Greek alphabet (alpha, beta, gamma, ...) in ordinary conversation. These are to supplement the more technical systems of naming the variants in the scientific literature.

★ Coronavirus variants get Greek names — but will scientists use them? | From Alpha to Omega, the labelling system aims to avoid confusion and stigmatization. (News item in Nature) my-ap.us/3uPC70F

★ Tracking SARS-CoV-2 variants (WHO information that includes a longer list of SARS-CoV-2 variants) my-ap.us/3vZJ0xQ

Mid-Winter Winterizing of Our Courses | Bonus Episode 63 (where Spanish flu is discussed)

Even More Pandemic Teaching Tips | TAPP 72 (where I apologize for using the term Spanish flu)

★ Image from Wikimedia

upper and lower case Greek letter "alpha"

 

Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? Are Mittens Too Big?

6.5 minutes

I first heard complaints about A&P textbooks being too large in the mid-1970s—when they were much smaller on average than today's A&P textbooks. But are they really too large? Let's explore that notion.

★ Your Textbook is a Mitten, Not a Glove (Kevin's brief article mentioned in this segment) https://my-ap.us/2E0sZP1
READ and RAID your textbook (Kevin's brief article for students on a useful approach to using their A&P textbook) my-ap.us/2P3KuBZ

★ Selling your textbook? (Kevin's brief article for students on why they need to keep their A&P textbook—to access that "extra content" in their later courses & career) my-ap.us/3g8Q9Fm

★ Plaid Mittens geni.us/yicVmBi

★ Photo from PxHere

person covering their face with mitten-covered hands

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? What About Novels?

7.5 minutes

Okay, novels can be too long. But only when they're not good. Long, good novels are, um, usually pretty darn good. But we don't dive into every detail of a novel when learning about it in a literature course, do we? What's this got to do with A&P? Listen and find out!

★ The Stranger (novella by Albert Camus) geni.us/Rwbw

★ Photo from PxHere

reading a book

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!

theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:

theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates

★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J

★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander

★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ

★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW

★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp

★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors

★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org

★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps

★ Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor

The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 17, 2021

Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 93


Weight stigma among health professionals is a form of discrimination that can have serious consequences in the lives of people who are overweight or obese. These folks are therefore often pre-judged as being difficult patients, for example. Krista Rompolski joins us for a Journal Club episode, where we discuss a paper on how attitudes about large body donors may contribute to weight stigma among health professionals. What's going on? Is there anything we educators do to influence student attitudes? An important topic for our times, for sure!

00:00 | Introduction

01:10 | Journal Club with Krista Rompolski

03:05 | Sponsored by AAA

04:01 | The "difficult" cadaver: weight bias in the gross anatomy lab

11:43 | Sponsored by HAPI

12:31 | The Conversation Begins

29:31 | Sponsored by HAPS

30:26 | The Conversation Continues

59:46 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofesssor.org/podcast-episode-XX.html/#badge

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor
Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates

Research indicates that weight stigma can cause physical and psychological harm, and that affected individuals are less likely to receive adequate care. For these reasons, weight stigma damages health, undermines human and social rights, and is unacceptable in modern societies. (Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity)

 

Journal Club with Krista Rompolski

2 minutes

Krista Rompolski joins host Kevin Patton for another TAPP Journal Club episode!

 

Episode 93: Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

The "Difficult" Cadaver

7.5 minutes

Krista Rompolski summarizes the essential content of this episode's journal article.

★ The “difficult” cadaver: weight bias in the gross anatomy lab (article from the journal Medical Education) my-ap.us/3yfanp1

Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 93

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

The Conversation Begins

17 minutes

Krista and Kevin discuss what they learned from the article and how that relates to their own experience as teachers and learners. Here are some background resources, if you want to know more about the topics discussed:

★ The Bizarre and Racist History of the BMI | Body Mass Index has been used in recent decades as a referendum on individual health. But it was never meant to be. (essay) my-ap.us/3fnmuaX

★ What We Talk About When We Talk About Fat Acceptance (public radio interview/conversation) my-ap.us/3btntoO

bathroom scale

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

The Conversation Continues

29 minutes

There is so much to say about weight bias and its origins among health professionals. Even more than we can fit into this lengthy discussion!

★ Implicit and Explicit Weight Bias in a National Sample of 4,732 Medical Students: The Medical Student CHANGES Study (the Phelan paper mentioned by Krista) my-ap.us/3wdG4wX

The Silent Teacher – A Conversation with Aaron Fried | Episode 29 (where Kevin discusses his wanting to be desirable body donor)

photo of fat people and "weight bias among health professionals: where does it start?"

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html
★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html
★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 
theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 
theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources
★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates
★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J
★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander
★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ
★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW
★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp
★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors
★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org
★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps
★ Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 3, 2021

Are We Answering Student Questions? | Science Updates | TAPP 92


Episode 92 is all about how we can use customer-service concepts in education. Tune in and hear Kevin Patton discuss the importance of being a good listener and empathetic responder. You’ll also hear about new research that shows not all plaques are bad actors when it comes to Alzheimer disease. And finally, find out how to get free almost-daily updates on life science, teaching, and learning!

  • 00:00 | Introduction
  • 00:53 | New Discovery about Plaque
  • 08:33 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 09:51 | New TAPP Science & Education Updates
  • 15:23 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 16:45 | Are We Answering Student Questions?
  • 30:52| Sponsored by HAPS
  • 31:40 | Power Skills for Answering Students
  • 40:19 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!

Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates

 

The most basic of all human needs is the need to understand and be understood. The best way to understand people is to listen to them. (Ralph Nichols)

 

New Discovery about Plaque

7.5 minutes

In teaching A&P, it's not our objective to dive too deeply into pathophysiology. But we do use it as a tool to help students understand and apply concepts of "normal" structure and function. A new discovery about plaque's role in Alzheimer disease—or perhaps what is NOT its role—is a story that at once helps students make clinical applications, lets students know more about the vital functions of glial cells, and gives a glimpse of contemporary scientific discovery.

  • Plaque Protect: Study Makes Surprising Finding About Alzheimer's Hallmark (summary article) my-ap.us/3aJFzCy
  • In surprising twist, some Alzheimer’s plaques may be protective, not destructive (announcement from Salk Institute) my-ap.us/2S9BvW5
  • Microglia use TAM receptors to detect and engulf amyloid β plaques (research article from Nature Immunology) my-ap.us/3eBEf5S
  • Image: dense-core amyloid-beta plaque (red) surrounded by microglia (white) [Credit: Salk Institute] my-ap.us/3gFlp0l

dense-core amyloid-beta plaque (red) surrounded by microglia (white)

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

New TAPP Science & Education Update

5.5 minutes

You may (or may not) remember that Nuzzel newsletter I've had going a couple of years. It was an almost-daily curated list of headlines of interest to anatomy and physiology faculty (and, I've discovered, some random non-A&P folks who just like the content). Well, Nuzzel is suddenly shutting down it's newsletter function and so I've switched to Revue by Twitter. Here's how to subscribe (it's free) if you're not already subscribed:

screenshot of sample issue of TAPP Updates newsletter

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Are We Answering Student Questions?

14 minutes

No, really. Am I really answering what each student wants to know? Or am I simply reacting to key words or phrases without really listening to the specifics of each student question. This segment asks us to consider using some customer-service (gasp!) techniques to make sure we're not leaving our students alone and frustrated.

face hidden by a question mark

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Power Skill for Answering Students

8.5 minutes

Starting with some "power phrases" from a recent article, we explore some words and phrases to use when answering student questions.

  • These 7 phrases can help you sound more powerful at work (article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3eykP1N

students

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 
The A&P Professor community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 
theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

 
Sponsors


Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.