Monday, August 13, 2018

The Syllabus Episode | Bonus | TAPP Episode 24


Introduction (2 min)
Do students read the syllabus? What is a syllabus? (8 min)
Reading and raiding the syllabus (14.5 min)
First-day activities | A syllabus quiz? (18.5 min)

Basic elements of a syllabus (13.5 min)
More things to put in a syllabus (12 min)
Study strategies, extra topics, & FAQs (8.5 min)
Conclusion (1 min)

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There is a peculiar aesthetic pleasure in constructing the form of a syllabus, or a book of essays, or a course of lectures. Visions and shadows of people and ideas can be arranged and rearranged like stained-glass pieces in a window, or chessmen on a board.
A. S. Byatt

woman leaning forward

(0:58) It's a BONUS episode, meaning that you get bonus minutes, meaning that it's a really, really long episode!
  • How eccentric do you think Kevin is? Other listeners want to know! Really.
    • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
    • podcast@theAPprofessor.org

 

(3:03) Do students read the syllabus? Maybe half? It's the other half who drive us nuts. Wait! do we always read the directions before asking questions?
What is a syllabus? It can be different things, right? Why do administrators seem to love the syllabus so much?

who needs a syllabus?


(11:09) Some general considerations when designing a syllabus include make sure that students can both read the syllabus through, and raid the syllabus for key information when they need it. The key is simplicity and logic in syllabus design.

(25:36) Is it just "here's the syllabus; see ya next class"—or is it an engaged look at important syllabus elements? The first day of class is key to starting things off on a good foot. What I learned from Krista, Michael, and Richard—and my own sideways twist on those first steps. What about a syllabus quiz? Is that a good or bad idea?

lecture hall

(44:24) What exactly goes into a syllabus? Who decides? What are the essentials? This isn't comprehensive, but it gets you

(57:47) Frank O'Neill recommends video walk-throughs, which have the added benefit of letting students know that you really do care about them. Consider also a table contents, abstract/summary, and/or index if the syllabus is long. How about a disclaimer, some playful tidbits, and links to external resources. And make sure your supervisors know what's in your syllabus!

(1:09:38) Consider putting hyperlinks or URLs in the syllabus to take students to other resources. Consider linking to a FAQ page, wher you explain your rationals for doing things the way that you do them in your course.

(1:18:07) Final thoughts. Okay, no real thoughts. Just be glad you made it this far!

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
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Monday, August 6, 2018

EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 23


Medical mitochondria (4 min)
Syllabuses: I need your help (1 min)
Review of first two parts of this series (3 min)
Featured: EVEN MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses (18.5 min)


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(0:42) New research proposes using mitochondria isolated from healthy tissue in a patient's body to treat ischemic heart muscle and perhaps other dysfunctional tissues or organs.

mitochondria


(4:44) Syllabuses, syllabi. Whatever. It's almost time to think about tweaking our course documents for the fall semester. I'll cover that in an upcoming episode, so I need you to send your contributions now!
  • Please share your syllabus ideas, questions, or comments at:
    • 1-833-LION-DEN or 1-833-546-6336
    • podcast@theAPprofessor.org

 

(5:55) It's too long for one episode, so it's a series of three episodes: 21, 22 (previous episodes), and 23 (this episode).
If you're not teaching online now, you will be someday! Most of these tips apply to face-to-face courses, anyway.
In  the previous two episodes, Kevin suggested:
  • It's all about connections.
  • Cultivate a friendly, informal, and supportive "online teaching persona"
  • Express empathy, don't just have empathy.
  • Use customer-service skills when communicating with students
  • Use our own pain points and frustrations to tap into how our students might feel
  • How we can literally make our online course a face to face course
  • How to use faces, voices, and scheduled course announcements to enhance the connections necessary to retain students and promote student success.

 (8:47) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin continues to share even more strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
This episode focuses on:
  • Why reaching out to individual students who may be at risk is important--and how to do that.
  • Why feedback to students is important in nurturing connections.
  • Some final thoughts.
communicating online
If you experience a repeated section starting about about timestamp 21:36, it's not your imagination. Probably. A pre-release version had such a hiccup and it may have been downloaded into your app. If so, you can simply re-download in the app. Or enjoy twice the fun by leaving the repeat in there!
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 23, 2018

49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 22


Syllabuses? Syllabi? Which is correct? (3 min)
Continuing the conversation (1 min)
Featured: 49 MORE Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses (22 min)
Next episode is part 3 of 3 (1 min)


Please nominate The A&P Professor for The People's Choice Podcast Awards! Simply click here to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category. Listener nominations close on July 31st.

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(0:44) Which is correct: syllabuses or syllabi? The answer may surprise you! Nevertheless, now's a good time to think about tweaking your course documents for the fall semester. I'll cover that on a future episode, so I need you to send your contributions now!
letters

(4:02) It's too long for one episode, so Kevin will cover the featured topic in three episodes: 21 (the previous episode), 22 (this episode), and 23 (the next episode).
If you're not teaching online now, you will be someday! Most of these tips apply to face-to-face courses, anyway.
In  the previous episode, Kevin suggested:
  • It's all about connections.
  • Cultivate a friendly, informal, and supportive "online teaching persona"
  • Express empathy, don't just have empathy.
  • Use customer-service skills when communicating with students
  • Use our own pain points and frustrations to tap into how our students might feel

 (8:10) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin continues to share a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
This episode focuses on adding faces to an online course (sort of like in a face-to-face course), plus how to use scheduled video, audio, and text announcements to stay connected with students.
"A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow."
Patton's Law (Gen. George S. Patton)
photos


(30:23) The next episode continues the conversation about improving engagement in online courses.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Please Nominate The A&P Professor for a Podcast Award.

I need your help.

I've registered The A&P Professor podcast for The People's Choice Podcast Award. Now, I need a lot of listener nominations to get the podcast to the next stage.

Can you take just a minute to register as a listener and select The A&P Professor as a nominee in the Education category?

Such recognition will attract more listeners and that will enlarge the pool from which we can draw ideas and share them in the podcast. Win-Win, eh?

Thanks for your support!


Simply click here: my-ap.us/award to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category.

Listener nominations close on July 31st.


So now would be a good time.

Monday, July 9, 2018

49 Tricks for Retention & Success in Online Courses | TAPP Episode 21


Transcripts, captioned audiograms, &  more! (7.5 min)
Intro to featured topic (1 min)
49 tricks for retention & success in online courses (32.5 min)
Connecting with this podcast (1 min)
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(0:41) We've reached 5,000 downloads because of your kind support! All TAPP Radio episodes have a full transcript, useful for reading along or searching for specific content. Captioned audiograms of all episodes are now available on The A&P Professor YouTube channel. There are many ways to listen!
cover image for YouTube audiogram



(7:58) Intro. It's too long for one episode, so Kevin will cover the featured topic in three episodes: 21 (this one), 22, and 23.

(9:13) Online courses are notorious for high dropout rates and high failure rates, compared to traditional face-to-face classes. Kevin shares a bunch (perhaps not exactly 49) strategies he has found to work in creating and nurturing the kinds of connections that help retain students and support their success in the course.
 person using laptop


(33:00) Call or write! Really. Any time.

Please nominate The A&P Professor for
The People’s Choice Podcast Awards!

Simply click here my-ap.us/award to register (free) and select The A&P Professor in the Education category.
Listener nominations close on July 31st.
So now would be a good time.


If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 25, 2018

Reading A&P Terms Out Loud Helps Reading Comprehension | TAPP Episode 20


How many genes in the human genome? (3.5 min)
Free book of brain facts (2.5 min)
Expand the reach of this podcast (3.5 min)
Why students should read A&P terms out loud (10 min)

Binge much? (1 min)

 

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(0:43) New research increases the number of coding genes in the human genome up from around 19,000 or so genes to just over 21,000 genes.

 

 

(4:12) Brain Facts book: great summary of basic concepts of neuroscience (with great pictures).

  • Brain Facts (from Society of Neuroscience; has links to low- and high-resolution PDFs, audio files of previous editions, and requests for free print versions for educators)

 brain

 

 

(6:50) I ask your help to spread the news and share this podcast with others who might be interested. Or complete strangers. Okay, maybe just folks you know who are actual A&P teachers or have related interests.

 

 

(10:23) It sounds wacky, for sure, but reading complex terms out loud before reading the textbook can helps speed up reading and improve comprehension.

man reading

 

 

(20:57) Even if you've already heard them all, it's worth your while to listen again, starting at Episode 1 and working your way through. If you know you've missed some previous episodes, that's an even better reason to binge!

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Caring for Students Helps Them Succeed | TAPP Episode 19


Summer schedule reminder (< 1 min)
Giving slides to students (6 min)
Update on the TAPP APP (1.5 min)
Catch up with sleep on weekends (3 min)
Commit to caring for our A&P students (19 min)

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You've probably heard that students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. Hold that thought.

(0:42) Reminder: episodes released about twice a month during the summer.

Slide handout

(1:01) Students often want a copy of our slide presentation before class, so that they can take notes by simply annotating our slides. Is that a good idea?

(7:11) The easiest way to listen to (and follow) this podcast (TAPP Radio) is with the feature-rich TAPP APP

(8:58) Is it okay to sleep in on weekends to "catch up" with sleep lost during the week? Some new evidence from a large study.

students

(11:20) Why Kevin is committing to take specific steps to show his students that he really cares about them. And how he is committing to care, no matter what.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Contour Drawing Helps Students Learn Anatomy | TAPP Episode 18


TAPP APP now available! (2 min)
Introduction to Paul Krieger (2 min)
Contour drawing for anatomy with Paul Krieger (19 min)
Change to a biweekly podcast schedule (1 min)

 

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Jean Fernel once wrote, "Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history. It describes the theater of events."

  

(0:44) This episode announces the availability of the dedicated app for this podcast--the TAPPradio app or TAPP APP. Kevin mentions the Android version, but after production, the Apple iOS app also became available. The app will provide some bonus materials and will usually have episodes available about 6 hours before they are released to other channels. It's the easiest way to keep up with this podcast!

 

 

(2:30) Paul Krieger of Grand Rapids Community College is a long-time professor and the author of Morton Publishing's Visual Analogy Guide series. Kevin and Paul have been friends and collaborators for over 15 years.

 

 

contour drawing

(6:10) In an interview with Kevin, Paul Krieger discusses a teaching experiment he is trying with his community college students that involves drawing as a pre-lab activity. Contour drawing, or outlining, organs can help students get a good sense of the general structure of organs they'll see during the lab activity. Hand labeling the sketches adds additional learning opportunities. Paul describes his method for moving students slowly and simply through a series of easy steps using PowerPoint slides.

 

(22:26) The summer break is a great time to switch to a slower pace for this podcast. After a series of weekly episodes, TAPP Radio now shifts to a twice-a-month goal for new episodes. Thanks for your support!

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 21, 2018

Kevin's Unofficial Guide to the HAPS Annual Conference | TAPP Bonus Episode


Getting ready for the annual conference of the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS)? Long-timer Kevin Patton gives some tips on how to get the most out of your experience, including Kevin's Law of Professional Development.

 

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"I learn SO much at these things!"
Kevin Patton (at every HAPS Annual Conference since 1990)

 

Kevin's Guide

(0:37) Bonus Episode Intro

(2:00) Kevin's Guide

  • You do NOT need a guide to the HAPS Annual Conference!
  • My creds for being your guide.

(4:04) Way Before the Conference

  • hapsweb.org
  • Early bird registration rate
  • Conference hotel block
  • Get to know the HAPS staff (including Skelly)

(7:51) Just Before the Conference

  • HAPS app and website
  • Read up on speakers and workshops
  • Business cards
  • Dress business casual, more or less (mostly less)
    • Don't forget your HAPSwear!

(16:11) Conference Basic Plan

  • Opening reception
  • Update seminars
  • Workshops

(18:44) Update Days

Kevin's Law of Professional Development

If I learn just ONE useful thing in a professional development experience, it's worth it.

(30:45) Workshop Days

  • Workshops
  • Committee meetings

(35:34) Other Stuff

(38:28) After the Meeting

(40:01) Subscribe

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 14, 2018

End-of-Term Reviews Help Keep Your Course on Track | TAPP Episode 17


How do you spell mamillary? (5.5 min)
Leave each semester with confidence after a course review. (22.5 min)

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"We can only be said to be truly alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures." Thornton Wilder

 

(0:42) Which spelling is correct, mammillary or mamillary?

mamillary body

 

(6:10) A slate of intentional review activities at the end of the semester can provide multiple benefits. That includes leaving things in good order for a more relaxed break.

course review

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

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Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 7, 2018

How Do YOU Pronounce It? | TAPP Episode 16


News & Notes | pig brains, new DNA found, TAPP, HAPS roadtrip (9 min)
Pronouncing issues with A&P terms (10 min)
The A&P Student blog (1.5 min)

 

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(0:50) News & Notes

Pig brains kept alive in the lab.

New DNA Structure

How to access journal articles: ask your librarian!

What is TAPP?

Your road trip on TAPP!

 

 

(9:25) Pronunciations in any language differ for a variety of reasons. This happens in A&P terminology, too.

apoptosis

 

 

(19:08) Kevin's blog for A&P students has many bits of advice to help students succeed in their A&P course.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Actin & Myosin - A Love Story | TAPP Radio 15



Why does the Golgi apparatus looks so weird? (5.5 min)
A love story analogy for muscle contraction? (8 min)
Don't forget the Alexa skill for this podcast!  (2 min)
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(0:47) The Golgi apparatus has a distinctive flattened shape. It turns out that it's the functioning of the cytoskeleton that is responsible.
 Golgi Apparatus. Credit: Kelvinsong

(6:02) Kevin tells the story of actin and myosin as an analogy to a classic love story. This playful story reflects the focus of recent episodes about the use of storytelling and analogies in teaching A&P.
 Romeo & Juliet

(17:50) Don't forget the Alexa skill for this podcast!
  • Enable the Alexa skill (Kevin's instructions on how to enable and use the new skill for this podcast; includes a video)
  • Alexa skill (Amazon's page for this Alexa skill)
  • Alexa-enabled devices (Amazon's devices that use Alexa skills; purchases made through this link help fund this podcast)

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Are Learning Styles Real? Why or Why Not? | TAPP Radio 14


Can adult brains make new neurons? Again. (4 min)
See you at HAPS 2018? (5.5 min)
Learning styles. Harm or help? Or a bit of both? (12 min)
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sketch of brain
0:57 Kevin revisits the notion of whether neurogenesis (growing new neurons) can occur in the adult brain, particularly in the hippocampus. A past episode mentioned a study that said "no" to adult neurogenesis in the brain, bucking current thought. However, a newer paper now supports adult brain neurogenesis. This is fun, isn't it?
5:07 Kevin once again invites you to the 2018 Annual Conference of the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) in Columbus Ohio--and to look him and say "hi" while you are there!

10:40 Recent buzz about the Husmann/O'Loughlin paper on learning styles prompts a conversation about what learning styles are and are not. And what, if anything, we should do with them.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Playful & Serious Is the Perfect Combo for A&P | TAPP Radio 13


 

Why the term meatus is weird. (3 min)
Convenient ways to subscribe to TAPP Radio. (2 min)
Playfulness and analogies have a role in storytelling. (14 min)
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playfulness


(0:46) The term meatus is properly pluralized as meatus or meatuses (not meati)
(3:31) There are a lot of options for convenient listening to this podcast!
pop-up frog toys

(5:19) Kevin explains why he thinks storytelling is the heart of effective teaching, especially in the A&P course. He outlines the "storytelling persona"; making sure there is a beginning, middle, and end to our stories, applying storytelling to both lectures and the entire course, using drama, conflict and resolution, and other techniques.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Storytelling is the Heart of Teaching A&P | TAPP Radio 12



Microglia prune synapses to remodel brain circuits. (6 min)
Kevin's new online seminar on Long-Term Learning. (1 min)
Teaching A&P tells the story of the human body. (15 min)
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Microglial cell and filopodia
Multiple synapse heads send out filopodia (green)
converging on one microglial cell (red),
as seen by focused ion beam scanning
electron microscopy (FIBSEM).
IMAGE: L. Weinhard, EMBL Rome
(0:47) New information shows that microglia nibble on presynaptic neurons using trogocytosis, rather than phagocytosis, to prune synapses during memory formation to help remodel brain networks. Microglia also induce postsynaptic spines to "reach out" to form new synapses with presynaptic neurons.
(6:50) Kevin has a new online seminar on five strategies to enhance long-term learning in A&P courses.

Storyteller
Storytellers dramatize their stories.
(my-ap.us/2uvWkPe)
(8:05) Kevin explains why he thinks storytelling is the heart of effective teaching, especially in the A&P course. He outlines the "storytelling persona"; making sure there is a beginning, middle, and end to our stories, applying storytelling to both lectures and the entire course, using drama, conflict and resolution, and other techniques.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.