Monday, June 11, 2018

Caring for Students Helps Them Succeed | TAPP Episode 19


Summer schedule reminder (< 1 min)
Giving slides to students (6 min)
Update on the TAPP APP (1.5 min)
Catch up with sleep on weekends (3 min)
Commit to caring for our A&P students (19 min)

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
You've probably heard that students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. Hold that thought.

(0:42) Reminder: episodes released about twice a month during the summer.

Slide handout

(1:01) Students often want a copy of our slide presentation before class, so that they can take notes by simply annotating our slides. Is that a good idea?

(7:11) The easiest way to listen to (and follow) this podcast (TAPP Radio) is with the feature-rich TAPP APP

(8:58) Is it okay to sleep in on weekends to "catch up" with sleep lost during the week? Some new evidence from a large study.

students

(11:20) Why Kevin is committing to take specific steps to show his students that he really cares about them. And how he is committing to care, no matter what.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Contour Drawing Helps Students Learn Anatomy | TAPP Episode 18


TAPP APP now available! (2 min)
Introduction to Paul Krieger (2 min)
Contour drawing for anatomy with Paul Krieger (19 min)
Change to a biweekly podcast schedule (1 min)

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

 

Jean Fernel once wrote, "Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history. It describes the theater of events."

  

(0:44) This episode announces the availability of the dedicated app for this podcast--the TAPPradio app or TAPP APP. Kevin mentions the Android version, but after production, the Apple iOS app also became available. The app will provide some bonus materials and will usually have episodes available about 6 hours before they are released to other channels. It's the easiest way to keep up with this podcast!

 

 

(2:30) Paul Krieger of Grand Rapids Community College is a long-time professor and the author of Morton Publishing's Visual Analogy Guide series. Kevin and Paul have been friends and collaborators for over 15 years.

 

 

contour drawing

(6:10) In an interview with Kevin, Paul Krieger discusses a teaching experiment he is trying with his community college students that involves drawing as a pre-lab activity. Contour drawing, or outlining, organs can help students get a good sense of the general structure of organs they'll see during the lab activity. Hand labeling the sketches adds additional learning opportunities. Paul describes his method for moving students slowly and simply through a series of easy steps using PowerPoint slides.

 

(22:26) The summer break is a great time to switch to a slower pace for this podcast. After a series of weekly episodes, TAPP Radio now shifts to a twice-a-month goal for new episodes. Thanks for your support!

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 21, 2018

Kevin's Unofficial Guide to the HAPS Annual Conference | TAPP Bonus Episode


Getting ready for the annual conference of the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS)? Long-timer Kevin Patton gives some tips on how to get the most out of your experience, including Kevin's Law of Professional Development.

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

 

"I learn SO much at these things!"
Kevin Patton (at every HAPS Annual Conference since 1990)

 

Kevin's Guide

(0:37) Bonus Episode Intro

(2:00) Kevin's Guide

  • You do NOT need a guide to the HAPS Annual Conference!
  • My creds for being your guide.

(4:04) Way Before the Conference

  • hapsweb.org
  • Early bird registration rate
  • Conference hotel block
  • Get to know the HAPS staff (including Skelly)

(7:51) Just Before the Conference

  • HAPS app and website
  • Read up on speakers and workshops
  • Business cards
  • Dress business casual, more or less (mostly less)
    • Don't forget your HAPSwear!

(16:11) Conference Basic Plan

  • Opening reception
  • Update seminars
  • Workshops

(18:44) Update Days

Kevin's Law of Professional Development

If I learn just ONE useful thing in a professional development experience, it's worth it.

(30:45) Workshop Days

  • Workshops
  • Committee meetings

(35:34) Other Stuff

(38:28) After the Meeting

(40:01) Subscribe

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 14, 2018

End-of-Term Reviews Help Keep Your Course on Track | TAPP Episode 17


How do you spell mamillary? (5.5 min)
Leave each semester with confidence after a course review. (22.5 min)

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

"We can only be said to be truly alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures." Thornton Wilder

 

(0:42) Which spelling is correct, mammillary or mamillary?

mamillary body

 

(6:10) A slate of intentional review activities at the end of the semester can provide multiple benefits. That includes leaving things in good order for a more relaxed break.

course review

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, May 7, 2018

How Do YOU Pronounce It? | TAPP Episode 16


News & Notes | pig brains, new DNA found, TAPP, HAPS roadtrip (9 min)
Pronouncing issues with A&P terms (10 min)
The A&P Student blog (1.5 min)

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

 

 

(0:50) News & Notes

Pig brains kept alive in the lab.

New DNA Structure

How to access journal articles: ask your librarian!

What is TAPP?

Your road trip on TAPP!

 

 

(9:25) Pronunciations in any language differ for a variety of reasons. This happens in A&P terminology, too.

apoptosis

 

 

(19:08) Kevin's blog for A&P students has many bits of advice to help students succeed in their A&P course.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Actin & Myosin - A Love Story | TAPP Radio 15



Why does the Golgi apparatus looks so weird? (5.5 min)
A love story analogy for muscle contraction? (8 min)
Don't forget the Alexa skill for this podcast!  (2 min)
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

(0:47) The Golgi apparatus has a distinctive flattened shape. It turns out that it's the functioning of the cytoskeleton that is responsible.
 Golgi Apparatus. Credit: Kelvinsong

(6:02) Kevin tells the story of actin and myosin as an analogy to a classic love story. This playful story reflects the focus of recent episodes about the use of storytelling and analogies in teaching A&P.
 Romeo & Juliet

(17:50) Don't forget the Alexa skill for this podcast!
  • Enable the Alexa skill (Kevin's instructions on how to enable and use the new skill for this podcast; includes a video)
  • Alexa skill (Amazon's page for this Alexa skill)
  • Alexa-enabled devices (Amazon's devices that use Alexa skills; purchases made through this link help fund this podcast)

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
Amazon referrals help defray podcasting expenses.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Are Learning Styles Real? Why or Why Not? | TAPP Radio 14


Can adult brains make new neurons? Again. (4 min)
See you at HAPS 2018? (5.5 min)
Learning styles. Harm or help? Or a bit of both? (12 min)
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
sketch of brain
0:57 Kevin revisits the notion of whether neurogenesis (growing new neurons) can occur in the adult brain, particularly in the hippocampus. A past episode mentioned a study that said "no" to adult neurogenesis in the brain, bucking current thought. However, a newer paper now supports adult brain neurogenesis. This is fun, isn't it?
5:07 Kevin once again invites you to the 2018 Annual Conference of the Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) in Columbus Ohio--and to look him and say "hi" while you are there!

10:40 Recent buzz about the Husmann/O'Loughlin paper on learning styles prompts a conversation about what learning styles are and are not. And what, if anything, we should do with them.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Playful & Serious Is the Perfect Combo for A&P | TAPP Radio 13


 

Why the term meatus is weird. (3 min)
Convenient ways to subscribe to TAPP Radio. (2 min)
Playfulness and analogies have a role in storytelling. (14 min)
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

playfulness


(0:46) The term meatus is properly pluralized as meatus or meatuses (not meati)
(3:31) There are a lot of options for convenient listening to this podcast!
pop-up frog toys

(5:19) Kevin explains why he thinks storytelling is the heart of effective teaching, especially in the A&P course. He outlines the "storytelling persona"; making sure there is a beginning, middle, and end to our stories, applying storytelling to both lectures and the entire course, using drama, conflict and resolution, and other techniques.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Storytelling is the Heart of Teaching A&P | TAPP Radio 12



Microglia prune synapses to remodel brain circuits. (6 min)
Kevin's new online seminar on Long-Term Learning. (1 min)
Teaching A&P tells the story of the human body. (15 min)
If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!
Microglial cell and filopodia
Multiple synapse heads send out filopodia (green)
converging on one microglial cell (red),
as seen by focused ion beam scanning
electron microscopy (FIBSEM).
IMAGE: L. Weinhard, EMBL Rome
(0:47) New information shows that microglia nibble on presynaptic neurons using trogocytosis, rather than phagocytosis, to prune synapses during memory formation to help remodel brain networks. Microglia also induce postsynaptic spines to "reach out" to form new synapses with presynaptic neurons.
(6:50) Kevin has a new online seminar on five strategies to enhance long-term learning in A&P courses.

Storyteller
Storytellers dramatize their stories.
(my-ap.us/2uvWkPe)
(8:05) Kevin explains why he thinks storytelling is the heart of effective teaching, especially in the A&P course. He outlines the "storytelling persona"; making sure there is a beginning, middle, and end to our stories, applying storytelling to both lectures and the entire course, using drama, conflict and resolution, and other techniques.
If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Test Debriefing Boosts Student Learning | TAPP Radio 11


 

Has a new organ been discovered? (4 min)
Students benefit from debriefing after each test. (18.5 min)

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!

interstitium

Interstitium. Illustration by Jill Gregory.
Printed with permission from
Mount Sinai Health System,
licensed under CC-BY-ND.

 

(0:46) Has a new human organ discovered? Or is this news mostly hype? Or is the answer somewhere in the middle?

students

(4:56) Testing can be a powerful learning strategy. Debriefing in a systematic way after each test can leverage the learning value of tests and boost learning even more.

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, March 26, 2018

Nine Super Strategies for Teaching the Skeleton | TAPP Radio 10



New Alexa skill for this podcast!
Free media from the National Science Foundation.
Tips for teaching the skeleton.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Nuzzel, Tumblr, or Instagram!


(1:25) If you use an Alexa-enabled device, you can now enable "the a. p. professor podcast" Alexa skill to listen to any episode, navigate within episodes, and save your place for your next listening session. Just keep this in mind when you do eventually join this growing trend!
  • Enable the Alexa skill (Kevin's instructions on how to enable and use the new skill for this podcast; include a video)
  • Alexa skill (Amazon's page for this Alexa skill)
  • Alexa-enabled devices (Amazon's devices that use Alexa skills; purchases made through this link help fund this podcast)
(4:41) A huge library of science photos, videos, audio, and other objects you can use in your course—from the National Science Foundation (NSF).
(6:56) Learning the bones and bone markings of the skeleton can be an early, scary experience for A&P students. How can we prepare and support them to learn the skeleton effectively—and learn skills to help them in their continuing studies of human anatomy?
  • Bone Names (Kevin's tip page for A&P students; located in the Lion Den website)
    • Short URL (to provide to students) is my-ap.us/bones
    • Provides a brief intro to bone naming and how that helps a student learn bones and markings
    • Provides 2 videos that walk students through the process of understanding bone names as a method of learning
    • Contains highlighted links to helpful lists
      • Lists are available as a docx or PDF "handouts" to use for study
      • Lists are also available as an interactive table on the web (can be sorted)
      • Access to lists requires a free registration in the Lion Den website
  • Skeletal Posts (from Kevin's blog The A&P Student, includes all advice for students on studying the skeleton)
If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
skeleton

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Supporting Returning Learners | TAPP Radio 9


Peripersonal neurons monitor our environment.
Daily headlines for A&P teachers.
Supporting learners coming back to school.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Life loves the liver of it (Maya Angelou)

 

(0:49) Several areas of the brain monitor your personal space—also called the peripersonal space (PPS). The peripersonal neurons each monitor one small "bubble" of our PPS.

 

(11:57) A simple analogy can help students remember a recurring principle about cell behavior involving important ions.

 

(13:07) Returning learners in anatomy and physiology courses often come to use with some anxiety. How can we support them?

If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

returning learners


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, March 12, 2018

Running Concept Lists Help Students Make Connections | TAPP Radio 8


 

Neurogenesis in the adult brain.
Cells hate calcium (an analogy)
Your take on teaching A&P
Running concept lists to enhance deep learning.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

(1:00) A new paper revives the old dogma that adult brains cannot produce new neurons—but it's not  without controversy. What should we tell our students? 

 

(5:52) A simple analogy can help students remember a recurring principle about cell behavior involving important ions.

 

(12:52) You've got some insights sparked by topics in this podcast series? Let's hear them, so we can get some power-brainstorming going! 

Toll-free:
1·833·LION·DEN
(1·833·546·6336)
Local:
1·636·486·4185
Email:
podcast@theAPprofessor.org

(14:24) We all find it difficult to put all the facts and details together in our heads in a way that makes sense—that helps us connect ideas and gain insights. A simple technique of running concepts lists can provide a concrete template for this process. Used over time, running concept lists and also train the brain to make such connections easily.

If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, March 5, 2018

Teaching for Long Term Learning | TAPP Radio 7


The temperature of mitochondria.
A podcast recommendation.
Revisiting the cumulative approach.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

(0:50) Mitochondria run about 10 °C hotter than the other components of the cell. 

(2:20) Paul Gabrielsen of the University of Utah introduces his new serial podcast that tells the story of the discovery of remains of medical education cadavers buried on campus about a hundred years ago.

(6:26) A comment on Episode 4 by Margaret Thompson Reece sparks continued discussion of the value of (and practical suggestions for) a cumulative approach to teaching and learning. 

If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

woman with computer and stacks of books


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Sunday, March 4, 2018

The A&P Professor | Trailer


Host Kevin Patton briefly introduces a podcast for teachers of human anatomy and physiology. 

Go to theAPprofessor.org and click PODCAST to listen or get more information, including how to subscribe.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Give Your Course a Half Flip With a Full Twist | TAPP Radio 6



New blood test for concussion.
Why red pens are not ideal for grading and feedback.
Flipped learning isn't as hard as it sounds.

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

(1:04) The FDA recently approved a new blood test for concussions. How is the test used and what does it tell us?
(11:10) It’s a small thing, for sure, but the color pen we use for grading student work can have an impact on the tone of communication in a class.
(13:50) Subscribing helps you and others stay up to date with the world of A&P teaching! And it helps other teachers find this podcast when they search for it.
(14:35) Kevin flipped his first A&P course in 2006, a year before the term flipped learning was first coined by Bergmann and Sams. In this segment, he discusses how his case study may help you decide how to flip (or half flip) your own A&P course.
If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Friday, February 16, 2018

Concept Maps Help Students Find Their Way| TAPP Radio 5



Use concept mapping for student learning and assessment.
Blood doping is a perennial news topic that helps apply central concepts of A&P.

If you cannot see the audio player click here.

(0:48) Blood doping stories related to the 2018 Winter Olympics (or in any context) are effective in helping student students apply and integrate diverse concepts in anatomy and physiology

(6:32) The featured topic is concept mapping and its uses in helps students learn and helping instructors assess learning and diagnose misconceptions and other learning concerns.
Sample concept map

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Cumulative Testing Makes Learning Last | TAPP Radio 4



Kevin shares his experience of using cumulative testing to strengthen long-term learning.
Use video walk-throughs to help students navigate your digital course platforms.
Sometimes other people's genes influence an individual's biological traits.

If you can't see the audio player, click here.

(0:50) Things will get a lot more interesting if listeners start calling in with questions, comments, teaching tips, programming suggestions, updates, ...or anything else on your mind!

(2:20) A recent article in Science explores the idea the genomes of parents and others can affect traits—not just the genes within the individual's genome. This concept of "genetic nurture" expands the notion of the measurable biological influences of genes.

(7:34) You can help your colleagues and others find episodes of this podcast by influencing the search algorithms that guide the process. How? By subscribing to The A&P Professor podcast in iTunes or your favorite podcast app. Even better, consider giving a rating and leaving a brief review. Unless you really hate my podcast, in which case, please click here. Fans, please click on one (or all of these):

(8:14) In this age of digital teaching and learning, we must be able to help our students navigate their digital platforms: learning  management systems, adaptive learning platforms, college/department/course websites, and more. Brief narrated video walkthroughs (screencasts) are simple and quick ways to provide clear guidance to individuals and whole classes.

(13:13) In the featured segment, Kevin shares his case story of using cumulative testing to strengthen long-term learning in his course. Using an easy method of adding a few questions from prior tests to each test and exam, Kevin was able to better prepare his students for the comprehensive final exam. And hopefully carry the essential concepts of A&P forward into future courses and careers.

More details at the episode page.
Transcript available at the script page.

taking an exam

Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Pre-Testing for a Powerful Learning Boost | TAPP Radio 3

The newest episode of TAPP Radio is here!



Pre-testing is not just for assessment—it helps learning, too.
A weird sneeze injury.
The Anatomical Society's list of online resources.
How many proteins are there in a cell?

If you cannot see the audio player click here.

A recent analysis suggests that a reasonable average number of proteins in a cell is 42 million. How might we incorporate that bit of trivia in our A&P courses? (0:41)

The UK's Anatomical Society has put together a list of online resources under the auspices of their Education Committee (4:40)

Can the explosive power of a sneeze cause injury? You bet. Here's a recently reported case of a rupture of the pharynx. Yikes. (6:11)

Pre-Testing isn't just for measuring prior competence before new learning starts. By itself, regardless of its use in course assessment, it's a powerful learning tool. Listen to Kevin's experience with pre-testing in his A&P courses. (10:28)

More details at the episode page.

Transcript available at the script page.

If the hyperlinks above are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

man doing online work on a park bench

Check out the detailed notes and transcript of this episode!